p53


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p53

A tumor suppressor gene located on the short arm of chromosome 17 that encodes a nucleophosphoprotein that binds DNA and negatively regulates cell division; frequently measured as a marker of malignant diseases.

p53

(pē′fĭf′tē-thrē′)
n.
1. A protein that regulates normal cell growth and proliferation and prevents unrestrained division of cells whose DNA has been damaged, as from ultraviolet or ionizing radiation. The absence of functional p53, usually resulting from a genetic mutation, increases the risk of developing various cancers.
2. The tumor suppressor gene that codes for this protein. Also called TP53.

p53

A 53 kD nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the proto-oncogene p53, on chromosome 17p13; in its wild form, p53 inhibits cell growth control and transformation; it activates transcription of genes that suppress cell proliferation, acting as a tumor suppressor protein; if p53 is physically lost or functionally inactived, cells can grow without restraint. See Li-Fraumeni syndrome, p21, Tumor suppressor genes, WAF1.

p53

A tumor suppressor gene located on the short arm of chromosome 17 that encodes a nucleophosphoprotein that binds DNA and negatively regulates cell division; frequently measured as a marker of malignant diseases.

p53

A gene that codes for P21. A tumour suppressor gene, the absence or mutation of which can greatly increase the probability that cancer will develop. When DNA damage, as from anticancer drugs, occurs in normal cells the expression of p53 is increased. The p53 protein may then act to protect the cell by halting the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired, or, if the DNA damage is too severe, p53 protein can kill the cell by APOPTOSIS so that the defective DNA is not passed on. Mutations in p53 have been found in a range of cancers including those of the breast, colon, ovary, bladder and oesophagus. They have also been found to be associated with failure to respond to anticancer drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
To answer this question, the scientists marked p53 with fluorescent dyes, making it possible for them to monitor the structure of individual p53 molecules.
Previous research indicated that p53 plays a role in normal neural tube development, but it had never been shown exactly how this worked until now," opines the researcher.
Since Grail is identified as a p53 interacting protein from our previous study,[17] we wanted to determine the correlation between Grail, p53, and p21 after treatment with 5-azadC or/and TSA.
"The widely accepted idea is that p53 suppresses cancer, but in our study we would argue against that," said Xu, a professor in the Division of Biological Sciences' Section of Molecular Biology.
p53 expression controls prostate cancer sensitivity to chemotherapy and the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3.
Previous research has found that members of the miR-34 family play important roles in immune cell (IC) regulation and act as a bridge between PD-L1 and p53. Members of the MiR-34 family are well-characterized effector molecules that are transcriptionally induced by p53, and they were expressed at elevated levels in cells that expressed wild-type p53 relative to their controls.[12] On this basis, Cortez et al .[13] demonstrated that PD-L1 is regulated by p53 at the molecular level.
These sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and also for p53 antibody (using polymer-based immunohistochemistry kit of BioGenx) along with appropriate positive controls.
A low level of p53 induced TWIST2, which kept the MSCs in a stem state, rather than promoting any differentiation.
p53 is an extremely versatile molecule, primarily involved in sensing the variety of cellular stresses.
On the other hand, p53 had an important anticancer effect and is functionally associated with apoptosis, autophagy, genome stability, and the cell cycle [10-12].