ozone

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ozone

 [o´zōn]
a bluish explosive gas or blue liquid, being an allotropic form of oxygen, O3; it is antiseptic and disinfectant, and irritating and toxic to the pulmonary system. Ozone that is carried in the air is odorless and colorless.

Ozone is artificially produced when automobile exhaust fumes combine with nitrogen oxide in the presence of sunlight and high temperatures. This leads to ozone pollution. Federal standards have been established to determine when the level of ozone in atmospheric air is unhealthful.
ozone alert a warning issued by health and environmental officials during periods of excessive ozone pollution for those individuals most sensitive to ozone, such as the very young, the elderly, and ill individuals, especially those with respiratory conditions. Advice is to remain indoors and limit physical activity. Healthy individuals are also advised to limit outdoor activity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·zone

(ō'zōn),
O3; a powerful oxidizing agent; air containing a perceptible amount of O3 formed by an electric discharge or by the slow combustion of phosphorus, and has an odor suggestive of Cl2 or SO2; also formed by the action of solar UV radiation on atmospheric O2.
[G. ozō, to smell]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ozone

(ō′zōn′)
n.
1. An unstable, poisonous allotrope of oxygen, O3, that is formed naturally in the ozone layer from atmospheric oxygen by electric discharge or exposure to ultraviolet radiation, also produced in the lower atmosphere by the photochemical reaction of certain pollutants. It is a highly reactive oxidizing agent used to deodorize air, purify water, and treat industrial wastes.
2. Informal Fresh, pure air.

o·zo′nic (ō-zō′nĭk, ō-zŏn′ĭk), o′zon′ous (ō′zō′nəs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Ozone is the most widespread form of air pollution. When inhaled, ozone irritates the lungs, resulting in something like a bad sunburn. The health effects of breathing ozone pollution can be immediate and include wheezing, coughing and asthma attacks
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·zone

(ō'zōn)
A powerful oxidizing agent; air containing a perceptible amount of O3 formed by an electric discharge or by the slow combustion of phosphorus; also formed by the action of solar UV radiation on atmospheric O2.
[G. ozō, to smell]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ozone

A gas consisting of molecules in which three atoms of oxygen are linked together. Concentrated ozone is a blue explosive liquid. Even in low concentrations the gas is poisonous and highly irritating. The ozone layer in the stratosphere, between 10 and 50 km above the earth's surface, is produced continuously by the action of ultraviolet radiation from the sun and forms a protective barrier, cutting down the intensity of the ultraviolet component in sunlight. Without the ozone layer we would suffer serious biological effects from solar radiation, including a large increase in the incidence of skin cancer. Atmospheric ozone is broken down by the catalytic action of chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFCs) and other substances. Recent studies have shown that ozone is involved in the oxidative stress production of ATHEROSCLEROSIS in arteries. Cholesterol is converted by ozone to 5,6-secosterol which is cytotoxic and induces the formation of foam cells in the presence of low-density lipoproteins.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Ozone

A form of oxygen with three atoms in its molecule (O3), produced by an electric spark or ultraviolet light passing through air or oxygen. Ozone is used therapeutically as a disinfectant and oxidative agent.
Mentioned in: Ozone Therapy, Sunscreens
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
COOL WATER FOR WOMEN: Another ozonic scent, this is exactly what the name suggests - light, fresh and more of an aroma than a heavy perfume.
There's also a range of new, lighter "ozonic" scents to choose from as cosmetic companies have rushed to fill the gap in the market.
According to Sue Phillips, president and founder, Scenterprises, New York, spring always sees lighter fragrances being requested and so the fresh, crisp citrus, green, transparent ozonic fragrances are what people are seeking out.
"For over a decade we have been experiencing beautiful, watery, ozonic fragrances that by their very nature are cool, fleeting and ephemeral," Bonofiglio writes.
The body wash category, for example, is being driven by fragrances, some of the more popular of which include ozonic (air)-, fruit- and water-type scents, as well as products that deliver such added benefits as antioxidant, antiaging, skin silkening and skin firming factors, notes Kathy Alaama, director of marketing at Sarah Michaels Inc.
Scents, all of which are for men, include Stealth (Air Force), a blend of marine and ozonic accords accented by citrus and warm musk; Liberty (Navy), billed as a platform of aquatic notes and with supporting accords of cucumber, aloe, melon, moss and musks; Patton (Army), a scent in which nutty coconut peeks out from behind a citrus opening of bergamot and lime and evolves into a sweetly woody finish with cedar, sage and hints of tonka bean; Devil Dog (Marines), which marries the rich, earthiness of agarwood, sandalwood and cedar with the juicy coolness of citrus and chilly mint accords; and Riptide (Coast Guard), a blend of citrus, herbals, woody accords and a hint of spice.