ozone depletion


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ozone depletion

The ongoing reduction of ozone in the stratosphere. Ozone (O3) is present in 1 ppm in the upper stratosphere, and it absorbs virtually all of the UV radiation from the sun; increased rates of sun-induced malignancies (e.g., melanomas) have been attributed to the destruction of the ozone layer. Ozone depletion is caused by the release of chloride ions from CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) after release from air conditioners, spray cans, and manufacturing plants that produce electronics and plastics. CFCs degrade in the atmosphere, release chlorine and cause ozone destruction, remain free, or react with ozone to form ClO (chlorine monoxide); O3 is being depleted at a rate of 4–5% per decade.
References in periodicals archive ?
HFCs' contribution to ozone depletion is small compared to its predecessors.
The researchers found that while the amount of ozone depletion arising from VSLS in the atmosphere today is small compared to that caused by longer-lived gases, such as CFCs, VSLS-driven ozone depletion was found to be almost four times more efficient at influencing climate.
This study underlines the importance of understanding the basic science underlying ozone depletion and global climate change," said Terry McMahon, dean of the faculty of science.
The reporting period can best be characterized as a period of transition for the GEF ozone depletion focal area.
In recent years, the amount of new information emerging on climate change, ozone depletion and air pollution has been so great that international governing bodies are requesting that parties limit the volume of information submitted for consideration.
Benefits are said to include zero ozone depletion potential, no global warming potential and relatively low emissions.
GFDL conducts leading-edge research to expand the scientific understanding of many topics, including weather and hurricane forecasts, El Nino prediction, stratospheric ozone depletion, and global warming.
He believes the findings completely change man's viewpoint about the impact of ozone depletion on life.
Dr Dylan Gwynn-Jones, of the Institute of Biological Sciences at Aberystwyth, a member of the team whose findings are published in this week's edition of the science journal Nature, says this could completely change our viewpoint about the effects of ozone depletion.
But concerns about ozone depletion and health risks associated with these chemicals have created a growing market for alternative treatments that still spell R.