oyster

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oyster

(oi′stər)
n.
a. Any of several edible bivalve mollusks of the family Ostreidae, having a rough, irregularly shaped shell attached to the substrate in shallow marine waters. Oysters are widely cultivated for food.
b. Any of various similar or related bivalve mollusks, such as the pearl oyster.
intr.v. oys·tered, oys·tering, oys·ters
To gather, dredge for, or raise oysters.
A bivalved mollusc which may be consumed raw or cooked
Health benefits Oysters are a natural source of iron, zinc and selenium, as well as vitamin B12

oyster

[AS. oistre]
A shellfish that, when eaten raw or only partially cooked, may be a source of hepatitis A virus and bacterial pathogens. See: diarrhea, travelers'

oyster

References in classic literature ?
And moreover, how about three oyster beds, one above another, and thick strata of good honest earth between?
Of course he could not prove the oysters to be his, no matter how certain he might be.
There's more money in oysters," the Porpoise remarked dryly.
Here, according to Nicholas's description of the beds and the manner of raiding, it was possible for us to catch the pirates in the act of stealing oysters, and at the same time to get them in our power.
We want a load of them; that's what we came for, a load of oysters.
And the Tatar ran off with flying coattails, and in five minutes darted in with a dish of opened oysters on mother-of-pearl shells, and a bottle between his fingers.
Stepan Arkadyevitch crushed the starchy napkin, tucked it into his waistcoat, and settling his arms comfortably, started on the oysters.
Not bad," he said, stripping the oysters from the pearly shell with a silver fork, and swallowing them one after another.
Levin ate the oysters indeed, though white bread and cheese would have pleased him better.
But the Queen of the Oyster Pirates was looking at me, a part-emptied glass in her own hand.
And the Queen began to make love to me, the latest recruit to the oyster pirate fleet, and no mere hand, but a master and owner.
And here I sat now, glass in hand, in warm-glowing camaraderie, with the oyster pirates, adventurers who refused to be slaves to petty routine, who flouted restrictions and the law, who carried their lives and their liberty in their hands.