oyster


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to oyster: oyster stew, Oyster pearl

oyster

(oi′stər)
n.
a. Any of several edible bivalve mollusks of the family Ostreidae, having a rough, irregularly shaped shell attached to the substrate in shallow marine waters. Oysters are widely cultivated for food.
b. Any of various similar or related bivalve mollusks, such as the pearl oyster.
intr.v. oys·tered, oys·tering, oys·ters
To gather, dredge for, or raise oysters.
A bivalved mollusc which may be consumed raw or cooked
Health benefits Oysters are a natural source of iron, zinc and selenium, as well as vitamin B12

oyster

[AS. oistre]
A shellfish that, when eaten raw or only partially cooked, may be a source of hepatitis A virus and bacterial pathogens. See: diarrhea, travelers'

oyster

References in classic literature ?
The beasts--however, it is simply absurd to suppose he did not know any more than to feed the beasts on oyster suppers.
Charley and I knew nothing of the oyster industry, while his head was an encyclopaedia of facts concerning it.
Our faces were unfamiliar on the Lower Bay, but as the Reindeer was well known as a fish-patrol sloop, the Greek boy, whose name was Nicholas, and I were to sail some innocent-looking craft down to Asparagus Island and join the oyster pirates' fleet.
And the Queen began to make love to me, the latest recruit to the oyster pirate fleet, and no mere hand, but a master and owner.
But the greatest miracle of the night was little Jacob, who ate oysters as if he had been born and bred to the business--sprinkled the pepper and the vinegar with a discretion beyond his years--and afterwards built a grotto on the table with the shells.
But when saying this, the man with the worn boots cast an uneasy look at his table, from which the oysters had disappeared, and upon which there was nothing left but a morsel of salt bacon.
A moment later he stepped briskly from his dressing-room, and observed that if she wanted to buy more oysters he thought he knew where they could find a fishmonger's shop still open.
Gaynsforth answered,--"some oysters, a chicken en casserole, lettuce salad, some cheese, and a magnum of Pommery.
Well, then, my friend, you give us two--or better say three--dozen oysters, clear soup with vegetables.
Skinner saw the preparations for their repast, the oysters, the cocktails in tall glasses, the magnum of champagne in ice, and chuckled.
This refection of oysters was not presided over by Affery, but by the girl who had appeared when the bell was rung; the same who had been in the dimly-lighted room last night.
It's a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir,' said Sam, 'that poverty and oysters always seem to go together.