oxyhemoglobin


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oxyhemoglobin

 [ok″se-he´mo-glo″bin]
hemoglobin combined with molecular oxygen, the form in which oxygen is transported in the blood.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ox·y·he·mo·glo·bin (HbO2),

(ok'sē-hē'mō-glō'bin),
Hemoglobin in combination with oxygen, the form of hemoglobin present in arterial blood, scarlet or bright red when dissolved in water.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

oxyhemoglobin

(ŏk′sē-hē′mə-glō′bĭn)
n.
A bright-red chemical complex of hemoglobin and oxygen that transports oxygen to the tissues.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ox·y·he·mo·glo·bin

(ok'sē-hē'mŏ-glō'bin)
Hemoglobin in combination with oxygen; the form of hemoglobin present in arterial blood, scarlet or bright red when dissolved in water.
Synonym(s): oxyhaemoglobin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ox·y·he·mo·glo·bin

(ok'sē-hē'mŏ-glō'bin)
Hemoglobin in combination with oxygen; the form of hemoglobin present in arterial blood.
Synonym(s): oxyhaemoglobin.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The percentage of oxyhemoglobin increased by 11.9% (p < 0.05), remaining lower than the control value (p < 0.05).
In addition, the degree of hypoxia and oxyhemoglobin desaturation experienced by the mice in our experiment is more severe than that commonly seen in the majority of patients with OSA.
The patient received supplemental oxygen and oxyhemoglobin saturation increased from 89 percent to 95 percent.
Physicians may choose not to give supplemental oxygen if oxyhemoglobin saturation is more than 90%, and also not to use continuous pulse oximetry given that it is prone to errors of measurement.
NIRS estimates local microvascular concentration of Oxyhemoglobin + myoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin + myoglobin by measuring light absorbency at 850 and 760 nm, respectively.
One electron is transferred from ferrous cation of an oxyhemoglobin molecule to molecular oxygen (Fig.1).
(5) This resultant hemoglobin, known as methemoglobin (met-Hb), cannot carry oxygen and the remaining oxyhemoglobin develops increased oxygen affinity resulting in impaired oxygen delivery.
This allows for an increase in oxygen ([O.sub.2]) dissociation and, therefore, a rightward shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve.
The lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (Sa[O.sub.2]) was 85%, and the time spent with Sa[O.sub.2] < 90% was 3.3%.
Since Frans Jobsis first demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring the concentration change of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) in 1977 [3], functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is getting more and more attentions in the past 20 years as an effective research and clinical tool [4-7].
The resulting green laser beam is strongly absorbed by oxyhemoglobin. In well-vascularized prostatic tissue, the density of absorbed power is high, raising the tissue temperature above the boiling point causing photoselective vaporization.