oxygen electrode


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Related to oxygen electrode: polarographic electrode

ox·y·gen e·lec·trode

an electrode, usually consisting of a platinum wire or dropping mercury, used to measure the dioxygen concentration in a solution.

oxygen electrode

An electrode used to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (Po2) or the blood glucose concentration of a fluid sample. Synonym: Clark electrode; Po2 electrode; polarographic electrode
See also: electrode
References in periodicals archive ?
The culprit responsible for Li-O2's short lifespan has been identified as lithium peroxide, a solid precipitate, which builds up on the surface of batteries' oxygen electrodes during the discharge process.
When the signal of the oxygen electrode stabilized in the 50 ml phosphate buffer solution, the certain amounts of calibration solution were added to achieve known [BOD.sub.7] values to the measurement solution.
The researchers sandwich a thin sliceof banana between a gas-permeable membran, which allows oxygen to pass through to the oxygen electrode, and a dialysis membrane, through which dopamine dissolved in a solution can diffuse to the banana slice, where the enzymatic reaction takes place.
Venkatesan, "The oxygen electrode. Part 8.--Oxygen evolution at ruthenium dioxide anodes," Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions 1: Physical Chemistry in Condensed Phases, vol.
An on-line system for measuring the rate and characteristics of photosynthesis in phytoplankton via an oxygen electrode. J.
The author assumes that in the state of limiting oxidation of oxygen electrode surface ([sub.s,d]-E = 1.23 V) an appearance of nanoclusters [SBNO.sub.1.23] with two surface [sub.sd][Pt.sup.II] atoms is highly probable (see Figure 2).
Unlike the oxygen electrode response, which is linear with concentration, these electrodes are Nernstian, with voltages being converted to flux values by the following equation:
Consumption and production of oxygen were determined with a Clark-type oxygen electrode and a closed, well-stirred chamber of 4.1 ml, as described in Herbert and Waaland (1988).