oximeter

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Related to oximeters: oximetry, pulse oximeter

oximeter

 [ok-sim´ĕ-ter]
a photoelectric device that measures oxygen saturation of the blood by recording the amount of light transmitted or reflected by deoxygenated versus oxygenated hemoglobin.
finger oximeter a pulse oximeter whose sensor is attached to a finger, so that the oxygenation of blood flowing through the finger can be determined. See illustration.
Finger oximeter. Pulse oximetry transducer properly placed on a finger. Fold the Oxisensor over the end of the digit. Align the other end of the sensor so that the two alignment marks are directly opposite each other. Press the sensor into the skin. Wrap the adhesive flaps around the digit. Courtesy of Nellcor Puritan Bennett Corp., Pleasanton, CA.
pulse oximeter an oximeter that permits measurement of oxygen saturation in an artery by recording the different modulations of a transmitted beam of light by reduced hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin as seen during the pulse. A component of the oximeter analyzes the variations in light absorption and provides a readout of the per cent of saturation of the hemoglobin. A saturation above 90 per cent corresponds to a PaO2 of 60 torr or higher. The presence of fetal hemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, or intravascular dyes may alter the accuracy of a pulse oximeter. In these instances a SaO2 of 90 per cent may not be associated with a PaO2 of greater than 60 torr.

ox·im·e·ter

(ok-sim'ĕ-tĕr),
An instrument for determining photoelectrically the oxygen saturation of a sample of blood.

oximeter

/ox·im·e·ter/ (ok-sim´ĕ-ter) a photoelectric device for determining the oxygen saturation of the blood.

oximeter

(ŏk-sĭm′ĭ-tər)
n.
A device for measuring the oxygen saturation of arterial blood, especially a pulse oximeter.

ox′i·met′ric (-mĕt′rĭk) adj.
ox′i·met′ri·cal·ly adv.
ox·im′e·try n.

oximeter

[oksim′ətər]
a device used to measure oxyhemoglobin in arterial blood. See also pulse oximeter.
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Pulse oximeter

ox·im·e·ter

(ok-sim'ĕ-tĕr)
A laboratory instrument capable of measuring the concentration of oxyhemoglobin, reduced hemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, and methemoglobin in a sample of blood.
Synonym(s): cooximeter, hemoximeter.

oximeter

A device for measuring or monitoring the oxygenated fraction of the haemoglobin in the circulating blood. Oximeters use photoelectric methods to detect colour differences in blood of different oxygen saturation. They are valuable aids to safety and are widely used in operating theatres and in intensive care units. See also PULSE OXIMETER.

oximeter

a device for measuring oxygen concentration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Masimo announced today that MightySat, a fingertip pulse oximeter designed for general wellness and health applications including sports, fitness, and relaxation management, is now available at Apple.
The purpose of this study was to determine the level of agreement between a portable pulse oximeter and Sa[O.
And for those who want to use their pulse oximeter to evaluate another physiologic dimension, MightySat is the only fingertip pulse oximeter available with the optional Pleth Variability Index (PVI(R)), a measure of the dynamic changes in the PI that occur during one or more complete respiratory cycles.
Technological advancements in signal processing have significantly improved the performance of some brands of oximeters.
Lifebox is a UK-based registered charity which aims to distribute 79,000 oximeters together with education in their use, to hospitals in less developed countries at no, or reduced cost.
This is the case with the pulse oximeter, a handy clinical device introduced in the late 1980s that facilitates rapid assessment of oxygenation status of a patient without have to break the skin and/or analyze whole blood.
A pulse oximeter is a two-wavelength photometer that determines arterial S[O.
Use of the Intouch system can help facilitate the implementation of JCAHO clinical alarm system recommendations by providing a secondary alarm system for pulse oximeters at the bedside.
2] was above 50%, pulse oximeters were not affected by variations in hematocrit, blood flow rate, tissue blood content, and pulse amplitudes.
This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Pulse Oximeters in Thousands of US$ by the following Product Types: Stand-Alone Devices (Bedside Devices, Handheld Devices), and Multiparameter Units.
Accuracy of two pulse oximeters at low arterial hemoglobin-oxygen saturation.