oxalosis


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oxalosis

 [ok″sah-lo´sis]
generalized deposition of calcium oxalate, in renal and extrarenal tissues, as may occur in primary hyperoxaluria.

ox·a·lo·sis

(ok'să-lō'sis),
Widespread deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys, bones, arterial media, and myocardium, with increased urinary excretion of oxalate; may be an acquired disorder, as in oxalate poisoning, or represent one aspect of primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis.
[oxalate + -osis, condition]

oxalosis

/ox·a·lo·sis/ (ok″sah-lo´sis) generalized deposition of calcium oxalate in renal and extrarenal tissues, as may occur in primary hyperoxaluria.

oxalosis

[ok′səlō′sis]
a condition in which calcium oxalate crystals accumulate in the kidneys, heart, and other organs and urinary excretion of oxalate increases. Oxalosis-inducing agents include oxalic acid, methoxyflurane, ethylene glycol, and ascorbic acid.

oxalosis

A rare hereditary metabolic disorder in which calcium oxalate is deposited in the tissues. The condition is caused by the deficiency of the enzyme D-glycerate dehydrogenase.

oxalosis

generalized deposition of calcium oxalate, in renal and extrarenal tissues, as may occur in primary hyperoxaluria.

pulmonary oxalosis
results from infection with Aspergillus niger; the fungus produces oxalic acid which causes tissue necrosis in adjacent tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical and pathological findings in fatal plant oxalosis.
CLKT addresses both the primary metabolic insult, namely hepatic AGT deficiency, and the consequent end-organ damage secondary to oxalosis, i.
The very rare condition oxalosis, important because of its systemic associations, especially renal disease, produces deposits at all levels in the fundus and may show hyperpigmented patches around the fovea.
Gibbs (2000) concluded that patients who overcome their epoetin alfa hyporesponsiveness remain unclear, and the potential risks of secondary oxalosis from high-dose, long-term ascorbic acid therapy should be considered because it remains poorly investigated.
Today, the Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation publishes an up-to-date list of foods and their oxalate content.
While there is little information available regarding the outcome from ascorbic acid induced oxalosis and acute renal failure, renal failure associated with primary hyperoxaluria can be effectively managed medically and carries a reasonable prognosis (18).
Insoluble calcium oxalate salts crystallize in the kidney, leading to urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, thereby decreasing renal function, and ultimately leading to end-stage renal failure and systemic oxalosis if treatment is not initiated (3).
Biopsy analysis of the nasopharyngeal lesion revealed the presence of a mycelium made up of septate hyphae and associated oxalosis.
org Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation 12 Pleasant Street Maynard, MA 01754 Tel: (978) 461-0614 Web site: http://www.