oxalosis


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oxalosis

 [ok″sah-lo´sis]
generalized deposition of calcium oxalate, in renal and extrarenal tissues, as may occur in primary hyperoxaluria.

ox·a·lo·sis

(ok'să-lō'sis),
Widespread deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys, bones, arterial media, and myocardium, with increased urinary excretion of oxalate; may be an acquired disorder, as in oxalate poisoning, or represent one aspect of primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis.
[oxalate + -osis, condition]

oxalosis

/ox·a·lo·sis/ (ok″sah-lo´sis) generalized deposition of calcium oxalate in renal and extrarenal tissues, as may occur in primary hyperoxaluria.

oxalosis

[ok′səlō′sis]
a condition in which calcium oxalate crystals accumulate in the kidneys, heart, and other organs and urinary excretion of oxalate increases. Oxalosis-inducing agents include oxalic acid, methoxyflurane, ethylene glycol, and ascorbic acid.

oxalosis

A rare hereditary metabolic disorder in which calcium oxalate is deposited in the tissues. The condition is caused by the deficiency of the enzyme D-glycerate dehydrogenase.

oxalosis

generalized deposition of calcium oxalate, in renal and extrarenal tissues, as may occur in primary hyperoxaluria.

pulmonary oxalosis
results from infection with Aspergillus niger; the fungus produces oxalic acid which causes tissue necrosis in adjacent tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardioembolic stroke in primary oxalosis with cardiac involvement.
CLKT addresses both the primary metabolic insult, namely hepatic AGT deficiency, and the consequent end-organ damage secondary to oxalosis, i.
The very rare condition oxalosis, important because of its systemic associations, especially renal disease, produces deposits at all levels in the fundus and may show hyperpigmented patches around the fovea.
Had the oxalosis not been revealed by post-mortem histology, additional information would not have been sought from the family and the cause of renal failure would have remained speculative.
Another interesting aspect of this case was the presence of oxalosis associated with A flavus; most cases of oxalosis occur in association with Aspergillus niger.
org Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation 12 Pleasant Street Maynard, MA 01754 Tel: (978) 461-0614 Web site: http://www.
The Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation recently awarded grants in the study of oxalate for $57,000 to Nigel Richards, PhD, and Chris Chang, PhD, of the University of Florida to study "Expression and Characterization of Oxalate Decarboxylase," and for $150,000 to Robert Freel, PhD, and Marguerite Hatch, PhD, of Northwestern to study "Intracellular Oxalate Concentration: Isotopic and Flurometric.
See Cystinosis; Kidney Disorders; Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria
JASMINE WILLIAMS - 18 years old - liver and kidney transplant patient - Texas Children's Hospital Jasmine is a liver and kidney transplant recipient who, at age 7, was diagnosed with hyperoxaluria with oxalosis type 1, a rare genetic disorder in which a liver enzyme is defective which impacts the function of a person's kidney.
Two recent examples we have encountered that are not included in existing categories of vascular diseases are amyloidosis, which can involve arteries and arterioles, and vascular oxalosis (Figure 4, A through E).
Seven adult Japanese rock ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) that died on a rearing farm and appeared to have suffered from glomerulopathy with renal tubular oxalosis were examined pathologically.