overuse injury

overuse injury

Sports medicine A sports- or occupation-related injury that involve repetitive submaximal loading of a particular musculoskeletal unit, resulting in changes due to fatigue of tendons or inflammation of surrounding tissues; OIs include tennis elbow and golf elbow. See Overuse syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is an overuse injury that affects 3% of the population.
"An overuse injury occurs over time from repetitive stress, causing increased pain and discomfort."
Previous studies have postulated different risk factors for dance injuries, but training load (defined as the duration of training multiplied by the rate of perceived exertion of that training) has not been evaluated as a risk factor for overuse injury. A recent study of Australian football players demonstrated that larger than normal weekly training loads and sudden training load increases are risk factors for musculoskeletal injury.
The researchers found that athletes with high specialization were at an increased risk of sustaining an overuse injury versus athletes with low (pooled relative risk [RR] ratio, 1.81) and moderate (pooled RR, 1.18) specialization.
Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, shares who is at risk for overuse injury and how to prevent these injuries from happening.
Overuse injury: The Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center (OSTRC) Overuse Injury Questionnaire (Clarsen et al., 2013) was distributed to all athletes via email every Sunday throughout the study period.
A clinically controlled study found theres an independent injury risk and serious overuse injury among athletes who specialize in one sport, according to research published in 2015 in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.
In this regard, prior research suggests there is a need to improve our understanding of acute and overuse injury patterns among high performing athletes.
More importantly, they found that the amount of unit training in terms of running distance was positively correlated with overuse injury. Later, in 2001, Knapik et al (47) expanded on these findings showing that overuse injuries accounted for 75% and 78% of male and female injuries respectively and that women were twice as likely to sustain training-related injuries as men.
An indicator of possible musculoskeletal overuse injury is walking or running more than 32 km per week13.
"Going too fast, exercising for too long or simply doing too much of one type of activity can strain your muscles and lead to an overuse injury," says Dr.