overstretch


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overstretch

(ō′vər-strĕch′)
v. over·stretched, over·stretching, over·stretches
v.tr.
1. To extend or use beyond what is reasonable, usual or proper: The army is overstretched in its deployments.
2. To subject to undue strain: employees who are overstretched working overtime.
3. To stretch (one's muscles or another body part) to the point of strain or injury.
v.intr.
To stretch one's body or muscles to the point of strain or injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Britain is by no means alone in its military overstretch.
With Iraq and Somalia thought to be next possible targets of American military attention, defence experts sided with Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith in warning that the 100,000-strong British Army could face overstretch.
The expansion of NATO at a time when Russia and other nations in Eastern Europe are going through the painful process of emulating the West by establishing democratic governments and free-market economies would be a classic example of ``imperial overstretch.
But Your Mortgage editor Paula John has warned people not to overstretch themselves and to think carefully before investing in property they intended to rent out.
MoD permanent secretary Bill Jeffrey told the Commons defence committee: "The word overstretch implies that what we are doing now is not sustainable.
An ex-Air Vice Marshall said: "The service is at total overstretch.
Lib Dem spokesman Nick Harvey said: "The consequences of prolonged overstretch could be disastrous.
Be careful not to overstretch yourself with commitments.