overreach

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overreach

the error in a fast gait when the toe of a hindhoof of a horse strikes and injures the back of the pastern of the leg on the same side.

overreach boot
a circular rubber boot worn on the front foot to protect against injury by an overreaching hindhoof.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bloom argues that the Marlovian overreacher lacks the interiority of Falstaff, Hamlet, and Iago.
Likewise, McNally's study of the Overreacher character type in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama not only anticipates his fascination with emotionally detached, manipulative observers of other peoples' lives like Stephen in The Lisbon Traviata (1985, rev.
These, together with a myriad host of scribblers, form a fascinating background to the posings of a likeable overreacher.
Marlowe was fascinated by power, and as long ago as 1952 Harry Levin called him The Overreacher in a study of the permutations of the will to power in his plays.
My emphasis is not on the old story of the Faustian overreacher, or the almost equally old - but currently fashionable - story that knowledge is power.
Ishmael, the narrator, is the both the brash "b'hoy" of the American streets and, figuratively, the wandering son of the Biblical Hagar, while Captain Ahab is at once the oppressor of popular culture and, by association, the evil Ahab of I Kings, the doomed overreacher of Renaissance drama, as well as Faust, Lear, and Prometheus.
Although unlike Marlowe's overreacher in most respects, Bolingbroke shares with Tamburlaine a consistent appeal to and use of the stylistic self.
Tantalus, like Kronos, is an overreacher, violating boundaries between self and other, between one generation and the next, between civilized and savage.
Following Browning's artist-persona, who at the end of the poem reveals himself to be an artistic overreacher, the speaker in Wilde's dramatic monologue likewise unmasks himself and shows his audience that his self-dramatizations as a neopagan rebel, a defter of sexual conventions and a conqueror of the monstrous were a kind of imposture.
Zenocrate's tears, the vicious treatment of Calyphas, and the doubt of Theridamas assured that this Tamburlaine did not emerge as a shocking yet awe-inspiring overreacher, but rather as a wholly unsympathetic portrait of a brutal tyrant bent more on destruction than on achievement.