overprotection


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overprotection

Limitation of the behavior or autonomy of another person due to excessive concern for that person's safety or ability to function independently.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cronbach's alpha for the father Overprotection subscale was moderate to low ([alpha] = .
Love and overprotection and dependency are not necessarily the same thing," Ferri says.
Due process--in Justice Ginsburg's formulation in her opinion--errs on the side of overprotection.
Others risk factors that researches pointed are low self-esteem, heredity, overprotection or lack of social support, traumatic experiences occurring in childhood or adolescent (Abramson, Metalsky, & Alloy, 1989; Kaplan, Sadock, & Grebb, 2007; Li, DiGiuseppe, & Froh, 2006; Lopes, Barreira, & Pires, 2001; Oliveiraet al.
Mothers may adopt a variety of negative attitudes towards their children, such as rejection, overprotection, pessimism about future, and irrational belief in their child's disability.
In another study Rogers, Buchanan and Winchell (2003) indicated that parents strict control predicted higher internalizing problems for children and suggested that overprotection by parents are positively related to anxiety disorders in adolescents.
These preferences were mostly given to those industries, which are enjoying overprotection and monopolised domestic consumer markets.
This increased need for assistance can lead to excess disability, overprotection, caregiver burden, and negative interpersonal relationships within social networks [3-7].
2010) concluded that, for boys, the model that included insecure attachment (ambivalent), parental rejection (from mother and father), and instruction permeated by anxiety (mother and father), were among the better predictors of externalizing disorders while insecure attachment (ambivalent and avoidant), parental rejection (from both mother and father) and paternal overprotection are predictors of internalizing problems.
These include parental GAD, behavioural inhibition, childhood separation and parental overprotection (Beesdo et al.
Parker and colleagues (1979) gave two-dimensional theory of parental bonding; a) care/warmth versus unresponsiveness, and, b) facilitation of independence and autonomy versus control/ overprotection.