optimism

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op·ti·mism

(op'ti-mizm),
The tendency to look on the bright side of everything, to believe that there is good in everything.
[L. optimus, best]

optimism

1. The philosophical doctrine that this world is the best possible one.
2. The personal characteristic of regarding only the bright side of a condition or event and of expecting a favorable result.
See: pessimism

optimism,

n attitude cultivated by an individual in which he or she believes in the positive resolution of a stressful event. In particular, persons with this mindset will use focused, externalized, and nonpersisting terms to describe his or her specific situation. Studies have shown that patients who are diagnosed with a chronic disease and adopt an optimistic attitude have improved health status.

optimism,

n the tendency to look on the bright or happy side of everything, to believe that there is good in everything.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 percent of his projection error resulted from general overoptimism.
The overoptimism at the planning stage relative to the nowcast is larger for real output growth than for nominal output growth, because inflation is projected too low.
relatively high percentage of cooperation renders overoptimism a more
122) Jolls, Sunstein and Thaler also point to overoptimism as a source for miscalculations of the probability of a bad outcome of certain events.
Similarly, people do not change jobs very often (32) and therefore have limited opportunity to obtain feedback that counteracts their overoptimism.
2000) provide evidence in support of role of investor overoptimism in explaining the long-run underperformance.
Teams should have reduced their bids for risky, inconsistent players rather than increasing them (or ignoring inconsistency entirely); it appears that teams continued to over-weight good years and fall victim to overoptimism bias.
While optimism can be beneficial, such as when it motivates us to persist in difficult and challenging situations and remain positive during times of despair overoptimism can have disastrous effects, especially when delusions about real odds make reality look better than it is.
With the overoptimism of the subprime era, the calculations that were done on a lot of these were in some cases overoptimistic.
There is a danger of overoptimism after a few wins and a massive amount of pessimism if we lose.
This paper uses survey data in an attempt to establish whether overoptimism or signaling can help explain the aforementioned student behavior.
Such a reversal in performance could signify initial overoptimism about the firm's prospects.