overmedicate

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overmedicate

(ō′vər-mĕd′ĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. overmedi·cated, overmedi·cating, overmedi·cates
To medicate (a patient) excessively.

o′ver·med′i·ca′tion n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He also contends that the focus on total cholesterol levels has led millions of people to be overmedicated with statins.
Shrugging off wars makes it that much easier for Americans--overweight, overmedicated, and deeply in hock--to shrug off the persistence of widespread hunger, the patent failures of their criminal justice system, and any number of other problems.
In today's high tech age with so much information readily available, it's hard to believe we are such an overmedicated society, and that the average person--for various reasons--may not be aware of the most simple dynamics of good health.
For decades, many of us have argued that boys are overmedicated, overly punished, and, in essence, discriminated against in schools for the unforgivable sin of being very bad at being girls.
1) We are a nation of sick, undernourished, and overmedicated people.
8220;Women are sick of being overweight, overmedicated, and overwhelmed - and are realizing that pills won't solve all their problems.
Rietschel and expressed concern that Paul was overmedicated.
The battle to retrieve an overmedicated America is heating up.
The family of the 36-year-old actor met with the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office Tuesday and expressed worry that Sage may have been overmedicated before his death.
Two other residents who were crying in distress at the scene were also ignored; * residents who were bedridden complained they were rarely talked to by staff and given little or no social interaction; * two residents were found partially dressed with no bedclothes covering them and their doors left wide open so visitors could see them; * one resident was admitted to the home without the correct sling for manual handling - this left them bedridden for three weeks; * in a situation described as "unacceptable", one resident was overmedicated because written guidelines were not available for their dosage, leading to "longer periods of sedation" that could lead to "deprivation of a person's liberty".
To make matters more worse the physician-patient's wife was a nurse who agreed with her physician-patient-husband that he had been overmedicated, thus being a party to the failure to have her husband follow doctor's orders and have an MRI.
But the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency found some children are being overmedicated on that advice.