overmedicate


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overmedicate

(ō′vər-mĕd′ĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. overmedi·cated, overmedi·cating, overmedi·cates
To medicate (a patient) excessively.

o′ver·med′i·ca′tion n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unknowingly, they can overmedicate with acetaminophen when they reach for an over-the-counter product containing this drug at the onset of flu, a cold, or fever.
And, with many on Rx medications reluctant to take additional supplements and "overmedicate," doctor recommendations will be key for trial.
That's partly because doctors are hesitant to overmedicate people over age 85, especially when most studies on lowering blood pressure have few people in that age group.
Unfortunately, Hooke suffered from mental illness and a host of physical ailments that led him to overmedicate himself.
But just as a doctor shouldn't overmedicate the patient, one should always be sensitive to the potential for creating imbalances, which could be costly to correct.
Irritability or mood swings, for example, have been attributed to women's jumpy hormones for eons; such labels have long been used either to overmedicate women or to dismiss their complaints.
Second, philosopher Susan Sherwin reminds us that, overall, doctors do not seem to treat female patients with the same care and respect as male patients.(14) Women's medical complaints have generally been taken less seriously than men's; doctors have been less likely to use existing diagnostic technology for women and more likely to overmedicate and misdiagnose them; and the degree of injustice deepens as the patient's skin color darkens.(15) Thus we have to wonder whether women who request suicide wish it partly because their doctors have disrespected and abandoned them.
Although numerous antimicrobial agents can be used following cleansing, some piercers believe there is the potential to overmedicate the pierced site with ointment.
Jack Kevorkian's assistance to the dying or merely undermedicate or overmedicate themselves.
Self-diagnosis might prompt you to under- or overmedicate yourself and, in both cases, ruin your health, says Dr George Thachil, specialist physician with Aster Medical, Dubai.
Carol (Paula Wilcox) has a panic attack and Joyce and Maureen (a scene-stealing Stephanie Beacham) accidentally overmedicate her.