overlay

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o·ver·lay

(ō'vĕr-lā),
An addition to an already existing condition.

overlay

[ō′vərlā]
to add to an existing condition or structure; to lay on top of something.

o·ver·lay

(ō'vĕr-lā)
An addition to an already existing condition.

overlay

a later component superimposed on a pre-existing state or condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overlay routing has emerged as a promising approach to improve reliability and efficiency of the Internet.
Pica8 leverages the OVSDB protocol to control hardware VTEPs (VXLAN Endpoints) as part of an overlay architecture and integrate with leading network virtualization systems such as MidoNet and NSX for VTEP provisioning.
Concrete overlays can be economically constructed for a 30-year design life.
The development of the Intuitive Overlays enabled patients to obtain a chromaticity close to that which is optimal for text clarity.
The CAD Overlay can be used in stand alone manual inspection or incorporated into an automated teach file.
One down side of having gel overlays is they do have to be regularly infilled, as the overlay moves up the nails as they grow, and sometimes can begin to peel off.
The second section offers a preliminary taxonomy for thinking about overlays that reflects the rationale for their existence/emergence and provides further elaboration of the sorts of technical, business/economic, and policy questions that overlays raise.
Polymer overlays of 1/4 inch and thicker can be applied using two very different methods.
Briefing Room Interactive represents a perfect application of the SMART Board interactive whiteboard and the SMART Board for Flat-Panel Displays interactive overlay," says Nancy Knowlton, president and co-CEO of SMART.
Once an IPB analysis is ready for staffing or distribution, the analyst can save the IPB, with all of its overlays, as an operational overlay, which becomes part of the common operational picture (COP).
Growth will be driven by saturated papers (76%), decorative foils (52%) and low basis weight papers (50%), according to the 2001 edition of GC&A's Forecast of Decorative Overlays.