overjustification effect


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overjustification effect

an explanation for the observation that if individuals are rewarded for engaging in an inherently enjoyable or satisfying activity, they are subsequently less likely to engage in the activity when given the opportunity to do so in the absence of a reward. It is proposed that the reward comes to justify engagement in the activity instead of the initial inherent enjoyment and when removed, there no longer remains a reason for taking part. For example, rewarding children for engaging in sport could undermine their inherent interest in sport.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, when the dependent variable is behavior during a free-time session, the overjustification effect has been demonstrated; however, when the dependent variable is measured as task performance, rewards often served to increase performance.