overjet


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overjet

 [o´ver-jet]
extension of the incisal or buccal cusp ridges of the upper teeth horizontally (labially or buccally) beyond the ridges of the teeth in the lower jaw when the jaws are closed normally.
Vertical overlap (overbite) and horizontal overlap (overjet).

hor·i·zon·tal o·ver·lap

the projection of the upper anterior and/or posterior teeth beyond their antagonists in a horizontal direction.
Synonym(s): overjet, overjut

overjet

/over·jet/ (o´ver-jet) extension of the incisal or buccal cusp ridges of the upper teeth labially or buccally to the incisal margins and ridges of the lower teeth when the jaws are closed normally.

overjet

[-jet]
Etymology: AS, ofer + Fr, jeter, to throw
increased projection of the upper teeth in front of the lower teeth, usually measured parallel to the occlusal plane. Also called horizontal overlap. Compare overbite, overclosure.

hor·i·zon·tal o·ver·lap

(hōr'i-zon'tăl ō'vĕr-lap)
The projection of the upper anterior or posterior teeth beyond their antagonists in a horizontal direction.
Synonym(s): overjet, overjut.

overjet,

n the horizontal projection of maxillary teeth beyond the mandibular teeth, usually measured parallel to the occlusal plane. When not otherwise specified, the term is generally assumed to refer to central incisors and is measured from the labial surface of the lower central incisors to the labial surface of the upper central incisors at the level of the upper incisor edge. Unique conditions may sometimes require other measuring techniques. See also overlap, horizontal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Correcting overjet is particularly helpful in protecting front teeth.
The Chi-square test (5% level of significance) was used to determine whether TDI was associated with age, gender, ethnicity, overweight/obesity, lip seal and overjet.
The maxillary and mandibular crowding was resolved; positive overjet and overbite were achieved.
14)It has been theorized that abnormal swallows in infants may actually cause malocclusions such as narrow arches, crowding and overjets.
Overbite, overjet, and Angle Class relationship, based on maxillary and mandibular first molars were considered.
Her occlusion was Class II molars with Class II division I incisors with an overjet of 13mm, anterior open bite of 4mm and bilateral posterior crossbite.
The patient presented with a class III malocclusion, anterior open bite and a 5 mm overjet.
An investigation of the association between overjet size, lip coverage, and traumatic injury to maxillary incisors.