overexposure


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to overexposure: underexposed

overexposure

(ō′vĕr-ĕk-spō′zhŭr)
Excessive contact with chemicals, drugs, physical agents, or psychological stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study we found that overexposure followed by underexposure and to a lesser extent patient motion are the primary factors for rejected chest X-rays.
Furthermore, significant rhabdomyolysis was present; it is, however, a rare presentation in cases of LPG overexposure. [4, 5] This was coupled with pulseless electrical activity, which is related to rhabdomyolysis.
"In summary, this report finds that alcohol advertisers frequently violate a relatively weak voluntary standard, resulting in substantial undue youth exposure and overexposure to alcohol advertising," the report concluded.
Thus, sunscreen may lull some people into complacency and overexposure to the sun.
He looks like a prune overdone, By overexposure to hot sun.
The state of affairs of commercial banks in Spain is under intense speculation, and it is believed that overexposure to a real estate collapse could force the nation to seek international assistance.
Bangladesh Bank (BB), the country s central bank, has sent show-cause notices to the seven commercial banks for not to complying with its directive to bring their overexposure to the market within the permissible limit.
"Banks suffer from overexposure to public debt of waning quality, while governments face the risk of new burdens from banks that might fail due to their overexposure to the ailing construction industry."
As both films are on different issues, overexposure of their trump card, Ash, remains a concern.
Overexposure to this heavy metal could damage the nervous system, causing mood swings and general nuttiness.
Children need to be physically active, but must learn to protect themselves from overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation.
of Florida said it will not renew about 60,000 homeowners policies in the state, citing overexposure and the need to "preserve financial viability."