overeruption

o·ver·e·rup·tion

(ō'vĕr-ē-rŭp'shŭn),
Occlusal projection of a tooth beyond the line of occlusion.

overeruption

A condition in which the occluding surface of a tooth projects beyond the line of occlusion.
Synonym: supereruption; supraocclusion

o·ver·e·rup·tion

(ō'vĕr-ĕ-rŭp'shŭn)
Occlusal tooth projection beyond line of occlusion.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Teeth play a significant part in maintaining a healthy personality, their loss might impair the quality of life.1-3 The loss of teeth, as a squeale to a number of factors, results in bad consequences such as drifting and overeruption, TMD's and risk of further losing the adjacent tooth/teeth etc.
Any knowledge about the consequences of missing teeth, such as drifting and overeruption, TMD's and risk of further losing the adjacent tooth/teeth etc, was recorded as 'Yes' or 'Don't know'.
The factors associated with anterior tooth loss include tipping of adjacent teeth, overeruption of antagonist teeth, midline deviation, masticatory impairment, speech problems, and lingual dysfunction.
The platform was designed to disclude the posterior teeth with subsequent reestablishment of the posterior occlusion from a combination of intrusion of the anterior teeth and overeruption of the posterior teeth [5, 6].
After clinical orthodontic examination (Figures 2-4), angle class II on the right and left side was diagnosed, overeruption (overjet 7.7 mm, overbite 12.7 mm) and facial dysmorphism (Figures 5 and 6): exophthalmos, hypertelorism, full cheeks, and prominent superciliary ridges were observed.
Missing posterior teeth may not only result in further deepening of the bite, but the condition may also lead to nonworking interferences, poor gingival contours, and overeruption of the opposing teeth.
Loss of posterior teeth in the maxilla or mandible not only leads to consequential shifting, drifting, overeruption and rotation of neighboring and opposing teeth, but it also alters the pattern of the masticatory muscle action and their effect on the eating habit and distribution of the occlusal load which, in turn, induces an irregular bone resorption and may interfere with remodeling and reshaping of bone.
The occlusal surface was covered entirely even if not all teeth need occlusal work and that was not to create problems related to unwanted teeth move- ment or overeruption.7 The occlusal features were restored and we were able to provide canine guidance at both sides and incisal guidance with posterior disclusion.
She also had Angle Class II malocclusion with retrusive upper and lower incisors, mildly increased overjet, and severely increased overbite due to both upper- and lower-incisor overeruptions (Figure 1, 2).