overcompensate


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overcompensate

(ō′vər-kŏm′pən-sāt′)
v. overcompen·sated, overcompen·sating, overcompen·sates
v.intr.
To engage in overcompensation.
v.tr.
To pay (someone) too much; compensate excessively.

o′ver·com·pen′sa·to′ry (-kəm-pĕn′sə-tôr′ē) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many scientists have in fact suggested that low-carb diets work simply because reducing or eliminating any major food group is likely to result in a lower total caloric intake, as long as the person doesn't overcompensate too much with other foods.
But skipping moisturizer can leave skin overdry, making it overcompensate with natural oils.
This avoids reliance on a fixed time delay, which can overcompensate run-down times for lighter loads.
They need to overcompensate because it's far easier to tear out and circulate a print placement.
To protect themselves from product spoilage, manufacturers often overcompensate with high volumes of parabens, formaldehydes, and other potentially toxic substances.
His anodyne sympathy for his cinematic victims--I mean, characters--evoked a high priest eulogizing human sacrifices to overcompensate for getting ya-yas frying them.
"Studies have shown that breakfast skippers tend to gain rather than lose weight because they are more likely to overcompensate for the loss of calories at breakfast by eating more high-fat foods later in the day," says Dr.
And, if anything, I tend to overcompensate on the theatrical side," McKenzie said.
Be careful not to overcompensate for your small leg length discrepancy.
New York State's provisions for structured judgements, while passed as tort reform in the 1980s in the hope of reducing litigation costs, actually overcompensate the plaintiff, resulting in awards up to three times higher than the present value of the jury award (Wolkoff and Hanushek 1995, Lambrinos and Harmon 1995).(2) The purpose of this paper is to examine the unintended consequences of New York State's Articles 50-A and 50-B tort reform by demonstrating how the post-verdict discounting requirements result in a pro-plaintiff bias and how this bias impacts settlement negotiations.
When encountering mulling inefficiencies in high-production molding systems, foundries often overcompensate bentonite levels to generate sand strengths needed to satisfy their requirements.
There has been research, most notably by Barbara Cooper, showing that elderly people with a diminished sense, such as sight or hearing, overcompensate in another sensory mode.