overanxious disorder

overanxious disorder

 
former name for an anxiety disorder of childhood or adolescence, now subsumed by generalized anxiety disorder.

o·ver·anx·ious dis·or·der

a mental disorder of childhood or adolescence marked by excessive worrying and fearful behavior not related specifically to separation or due to recent stress, now included within generalized anxiety disorder.

o·ver·anx·ious dis·or·der

(ō'vĕr-angk'shŭs dis-ōr'dĕr)
A mental disorder of childhood or adolescence marked by excessive worry and fearful behavior not related specifically to separation or due to recent stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Influence of overanxious disorder of childhood on the expression of anorexia nervosa.
Social phobia and overanxious disorder in school-age children.
The following ICD-9 codes were used to evaluate for the diagnosis of depression or anxiety: 311 (including all 311 codes for depressive disorders), 648.4 (postpartum depression), 313.1 (misery and unhappiness in childhood), 309.0 (adjustment disorder with depressed mood), 309.1 (prolonged depressive reaction), 300 (including all 300 codes for anxiety disorders), 313.0 (overanxious disorder in childhood), 309.21 (separation anxiety), and 309.24 (adjustment with disorder with anxiety).
Comorbidity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and overanxious disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 1992; 31:197-203.
Birmaher et a1 (24) evaluated 21 pediatric patients with overanxious disorder, social phobia, or separation anxiety who had not responded to psychotherapy and were not depressed; all patients received flexibly-dosed fluoxetine for up to 10 months.
Initially classified as an overanxious reaction by the DSM-II (APA, 1968), revisions soon led to this pattern of excessive worrying being labeled overanxious disorder (OAD) in DSM-III-R (APA, 1987).
For example, researchers at Griffith University in Nathan, Australia randomly assigned 79 children aged 7-14 years with separation anxiety, overanxious disorder, or social phobia to receive CBT or CBT plus family management, or to be on a waiting list.
For example, researchers at Griffith University in Nathan, Australia, randomly assigned 79 children aged 7-14 years with separation anxiety, overanxious disorder, or social phobia to receive CBT or CBT plus family management, or to be on a waiting list.
This is followed sequentially by separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety and overanxious disorder, OCD, and social phobia.
Separation anxiety disorder, overanxious disorder, and school refusal.
Some diagnoses now applied to children -- including identity disorder, overanxious disorder and avoidant disorder -- probably will not make DSM's final cut, the authors say.