overaction

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overaction 

Term referring to the excessive action of an extraocular muscle as a consequence of palsy or limitation to the ipsilateral antagonist or the contralateral synergist. See Table M5.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of the cameo roles, played by members of the ensemble, are overacted with verve, especially the series of amateur playwrights that dog Oscar.
However, some tapes, such as "How To Deal With Difficult People," are overacted, which lessens the impact of an otherwise sound message.
He said he was concerned overacts of terrorism, missing persons, economic situation.
HOT ROD ( 12) A hare-brained comedy pitched somewhere between Talladega Nights and Napoleon Dynamite in which Ian McShane overacts wildly
If the movie is visually dizzying, stridently overacted, and beyond tasteless, it's also staggeringly ambitious and the next best thing to irresistible.
A section of behind-the-bike-shed gigglers actually enjoy this woefully scripted, wildly overacted tosh.
Home Office officials submitted a letter to the tribunal which showed Chindamo had "overacted" to situations on several occasions, and predicted it would be extremely difficult to find him somewhere to live on release.
In John Cranko's Onegin, Irina Dvorovenko as the heroine Tatiana and Giuseppe Picone (who has also left ABT) in the title role both overacted: His melancholy slipped into petulance; her subtlest gestures shouted.
However, as long as unsophisticated people like Mike James and his ilk continue to giggle hysterically at the moronic antics of this juvenile, witless, wildly overacted tosh, the situation will not improve.
In the scene where he almost has a second attack (when spying on a nude Erica) he overacts for all he's worth.
Dorff overacts wildly, the plot has as many holes as the decaying Manor, and apart from a couple of reasonable shocks there are no real thrills to be had.
Though she slightly overacted in her first performance, her second produced a sensitive and sympathetic heroine, clearly showing the development of giddy girlish affection into deep, devoted love.