ovarian vein


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Related to ovarian vein: ovarian artery, ovarian vein syndrome

ovarian vein

one of a pair of veins that emerge from convoluted plexuses in the broad ligament near the ovaries and the uterine tubes. The veins from each plexus ascend and unite to form single veins. The right ovarian vein opens into the inferior vena cava and the left ovarian vein into the renal vein. In some individuals the ovarian veins contain valves and greatly enlarge during pregnancy. Compare testicular vein.

ovarian vein

In females, any of the veins that accompany the ovarian artery and that drain the ovary and Fallopian tube. Outside the broad ligament, the ovarian veins collect into two veins on each side of the body. These veins accompany the ovarian artery and merge into a single vein; the right ovarian vein then empties into the inferior cava (below the renal vein), while the left ovarian vein empties into the left renal vein.
See also: vein
References in periodicals archive ?
When associated with parturition, ovarian vein thrombosis usually becomes apparent within the first week after delivery, [4] with significant clinical symptoms often mimicking appendicitis.
Extensive gynaecological surgery for malignant disease constitutes another recognised cause of ovarian vein thrombosis.
It is worth noting that reported cases of ovarian vein thrombosis in association with hysterectomy for benign disease, as in our case, are rare and the literature does not give clear recommendations on whether ovarian vein thrombosis in association with benign disease should be treated.
The diagnosis of ovarian vein thrombosis can be established by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT with sensitivities of 52%, 92% and 100%, respectively.
Although uncommon, ovarian vein thrombosis should be considered for some months as a cause of pelvic pain in patients who have undergone surgery for benign gynaecological conditions.
If left untreated, ovarian vein thrombophlebitis may extend into the renal veins or the inferior vena cava and can result in a pulmonary embolism.
The lack of filling of a large, tortuous puerperal ovarian vein can be seen on 2- or 3-dimensional time-of-flight MR venography.
Diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome is often missed because women lie down for a pelvic exam, relieving pressure from the ovarian veins, so that the veins no longer bulge with blood as they do while a woman is standing.
For reflux in ovarian veins, interventional radiologists performed an embolization using imaging for guidance.