oval window


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Related to oval window: round window

window

 [win´do]
a circumscribed opening in a plane surface; called also fenestra.
aortic window a radiolucent region below the aortic arch, formed by the bifurcation of the trachea, visible in the left anterior oblique radiograph of the heart and great vessels.
window of cochlea (cochlear window) round window.
oval window an oval opening in the inner wall of the middle ear, which is closed by the stapes; called also vestibular window and fenestra vestibuli.
round window a round opening in the middle ear covered by the secondary tympanic membrane; called also cochlear window and fenestra cochleae.
vestibular window (window of vestibule) oval window.

o·val win·dow

[TA]
a membrane-covered oval opening on the medial wall of the tympanic cavity leading into the vestibule, closed in life by the foot of the stapes.

oval window

n.
The oval opening in the middle ear to which the base of the stapes is connected and through which the ossicles of the ear transmit sound vibrations to the cochlea.

oval window

[ō′vəl]
Etymology: L, ovum; ME, windoge
an aperture in the wall of the middle ear, leading to the inner ear. The footplate of the stapes vibrates in the oval window, transmitting sound waves to the cochlea. Also called vestibular window.

fe·nes·tra ves·tib·u·li

(fĕ-nes'tră ves-tib'yū-lī) [TA]
An oval opening on the medial wall of the tympanic cavity leading into the vestibule, closed by the foot of the stapes.
Synonym(s): oval window.

oval window

The oval opening in the outer wall of the inner ear in which the footplate of the inner of the three AUDITORY OSSICLES, the stapes, is free to vibrate.

oval window

a membranous wall at the junction of the middle ear and inner ear which connects the stapes with the vestibular canal of the COCHLEA.

Oval window

A tiny opening at the entrance to the inner ear.
Mentioned in: Hearing Aids

window

a circumscribed opening in a plane surface.

cochlear window, fenestra cochleae
an aperture between the tympanic cavity of the middle ear and the cochlea of the internal ear; covered by the secondary tympanic membrane. Called also round window.
oval window
an oval opening in the inner wall of the middle ear, which is closed by the stapes; called also fenestra vestibuli.
round window
see cochlear window (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Ogura, "Temporal bone pathology in congenital anomalies of the oval window and the facial nerve," Auris Nasus Larynx, vol.
Then, bone chips obtained from the stapes suprastructure were placed around the shaft of the prosthesis to seal the oval window.
If a piston prosthesis has been displaced from the oval window because of ankylosis to the lenticular process, use a laser to detach the prosthesis.
Elimination of the third-window effect occurs, thus reestablishing a two-window system between the oval window and the site of canal dehiscence.
Major advancements in our understanding of PLF as a cause of sudden deafness were made by Lawrence and McCabe, (11) who conducted early animal studies; Simmons, (12) who proposed the theory of membrane breaks in sudden hearing loss; and Stroud and Calcaterra, (13) who were the first to propose the idea of spontaneous oval window PLF.
Care is taken not to traumatize the spherical recess of the saccule straight through the oval window because any small break in this area results in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow; if a CSF leak does occur, it should be packed off.
The eustachian tube orifice, the oval window, and the round window were also filled with granulation tissue.
7,8) Blast injuries may cause disruption of the round or oval window membranes and result in sensorineural loss, but noise-induced temporary or permanent threshold shifts have also been described with these injuries.
8-mm fluoroplastic prosthesis was inserted, and the oval window niche was sealed off with fat.
A dark area could be seen in the footplate that represented a fistula in the oval window (figure).
A piece of loose areolar tissue was harvested through a postauricular incision and used to seal the oval window.
Iatrogenic CSF leaks commonly occur through the cells of the petrous apex to the tympanic cavity or eustachian tube, through the perilabyrinthine cells to the mastoid antrum, through the mastoid air cells at the craniotomy site, or through an opened vestibule and oval window.