outbreed

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outbreed

(out′brēd′)
v. out·bred (-brĕd′), out·breeding, out·breeds
v.tr.
To subject to outbreeding.
v.intr.
To engage in outbreeding.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects of acute Toxoplasma infection on the microbiome observed in this study using outbred mice were similar to the effects reported with other models in which increased numbers of Bacteroidetes [50-54] and decreased levels of Firmicutes [51, 52, 54] were identified.
This effort resulted in two sister populations, the Collaborative Cross (CC) and the Diversity Outbred (DO) (Figure 1).
Twenty-six commonly used microsatellite loci were employed to analyze the genetic diversity of the outbred WZS minipigs by multi-PCR as previous report [12].
This clearly shows that when MHC molecules impede the correct peptide presentation, regulatory responses are not triggered as it happens in the outbred mice.
On the detection of imprinted quantitative trait loci in experimental crosses of outbred species.
Results obtained with the IUAI in the outbred SD strain suggest that the protocol is reliable and can be used to assure fertilization of apt females (75% of the inseminated SD females were pregnant at the time of sacrifice) but it has inherent [imitations.
Female mice treated topically with diclofenac developed 2.43-fold more malignant tumors (25% versus 61.3%) in the 25-week model compared to the 10-week model (Table 1), but due to both the smaller amount of tumors developed and the inherent variable nature of this outbred strain, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.1565).
We used eight-ten week old outbred NMRI mice for all males (fertile and vasectomised) and females (recipient and donor).
"Christians are being outbred by the majority Muslim populations in their countries and they are almost hopelessly divided.
For the purpose of this review, high-risk genes are defined as those that clearly cause a lifetime risk of breast cancer of >40% and as such are relatively rare with population frequencies in most outbred populations of below 1 in 200.