wedlock

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wedlock

noun The state of being married; marriage.
References in periodicals archive ?
I see no valid reason why there are still distinctions between children born out of wedlock and those born in a marital union.
Children who were born out of wedlock could get birth certificates regardless of who their father is," he said.
Currently, children born in wedlock are registered as ''eldest son'' or ''eldest daughter'' and so on, but those born out of wedlock are registered as simply ''female'' or ''male.
Fathers' prenatal involvement will be positively associated with the number of peers and siblings with children born out of wedlock.
It is an appalling state of societytoday that you have written: ``If you introduced a policy of never featuring stories about people whose children were born out of wedlock, your news would be a poor reflection of life in the 21st century''.
She is the second Nigerian woman condemned to death for having sex out of wedlock since Islamic law, or Shariah, was introduced in a dozen northern states.
McFadden continues to chronicle the hapless life of Sugar Lacey, who was born out of wedlock in rural Arkansas, is abandoned by her parents at birth, and eventually becomes a prostitute.
Robinson, born out of wedlock, a victim of childhood sexual abuse who was forced to leave her home at the age of 16, has proven her affirmation in her latest book, Yes, You Can: How to Start, Operate, & Grow a Business While Developing Yourself and Pursuing Your Personal Goals (APU Publishing Group, $18).
The proportion of first births that were conceived out of wedlock to women aged 15-29 nearly tripled in the past six decades, rising to 53% in 1990-1994.
Abetted by an increase in conceptions out of wedlock and a slight shrinking of intervals between births, falling ages at marriage generated a population boom: England grew four times faster than its continental rivals from 1550 to 1820.
Sports Illustrated was the first to reveal that Palmer, the Hall of Fame former Baltimore Orioles pitcher, had a child out of wedlock.