attar

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attar

An essential oil (e.g., attar of roses). Medicated aromatic oils are not used in the mainstream medical practice.
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WEDDING CAR Ottar and Marianne borrowed a guest's hire car to get to reception after coach mishap.
John's 1970); Ottar Brox, Newfoundland Fishermen; Cato Wadel, Marginal Adaptations and Modernizatin in Newfoundland (St.
However, when examining the sensitivity and specificity of this study compared with that of other studies using the MTI Photoscreener (Freedman & Preston, 1992; Ottar et al.
The Arctic Circle was first crossed at sea by Ottar (see 870), though unnamed primitives must surely have ventured past it on land earlier.
The newly built Norwegian factory trawler, Ottar Birting, provided a showcase for Stal's latest equipment.
STRAX are naturally delighted to have been appointed manufacturer and exclusive European distributor, and we look forward to a long and successful partnership with Phonebites," said Jon Ottar Birgisson, STRAX Commercial Director.
DeepOcean's Ottar Maeland, executive vice-president for the Greater North Sea, said: "We are delighted to be expanding our relationship with DONG Energy from the offshore oil and gas market to the key growth area of offshore wind.
Ottar Maeland, DeepOcean's executive vice president Greater North Sea, said: "This award of array cables installation for Nobelwind is the first commitment for DeepOcean's new chartered cable lay vessel currently being constructed by Damen Yard for delivery early 2016.
Arve Ulvik, [1] Marta Ebbing, [2] Steinar Hustad, [3,8] Oivind Midttun, [1] Ottar Nygard, [2,3] Stein E.
NEAREST THE PIN (2ND HOLE) Sponsored by Newly Weds Foods 1st Ottar Yngvasson, Iceland Export Center.
The eagle had gorged itself on more than three pounds of food, roughly half its normal weight, said Norwegian bird expert Alv Ottar Folkestad.
Ottar Brox brings his point home more forcefully in the concluding chapter, where he stresses that the problems in "establishing viable common resource management regimes are not so much academic as they are political" (p.