ototoxic


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ototoxic

 [o´to-tok″sik]
having a damaging effect upon the eighth cranial (vestibulocochlear) nerve or on the organs of hearing and balance.

o·to·tox·ic

(ō'tō-tok'sik),
Relating to ototoxicity.

ototoxic

(ō′tə-tŏk′sĭk)
adj.
Having a toxic effect on the structures of the ear, especially on its nerve supply.

o′to·tox·ic′i·ty (-tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

ototoxic

adjective Referring to a substance or process that is toxic to the vestibulo-auditory apparatus.

o·to·tox·ic

(ō'tō-tok'sik)
Having a toxic action on the ear.
[oto- + G. toxikon, poison]

Ototoxic

Damaging to the nerves controlling the senses of hearing and balance.
Mentioned in: Tinnitus
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultrahigh frequencies up to 12 KHz have also been reported to be finely tuned to the effect of damaging environmental factors such as noise and ototoxic drugs (Campbell, 2007).
We compiled information on their demographic data, including education level, as well as the duration of otologic and other associated symptoms before presentation, the type of ototoxic agent implicated, the disease for which the agent was indicated, other clinical features, the results of basic audiologic investigations (audiometry and tympanometry), the treatment modalities that were offered, and follow-up visits.
Effective intervention is needed to improve industrial safety of individuals experiencing ototoxic effects of solvents.
In mammals, spiral ganglion neurons are hardly recovered from injury [71, 72] and the auditory nerve fibers often degenerate after ototoxic insult, including noise damage and ototoxic drugs.
Prematurity and low birth weight, asphyxia, hyperbilirubinaemia, use of aminoglycosides and other ototoxic drugs, bacterial meningitis and intrauterine infections, craniofacial anomalies and prolonged mechanical ventilation are among the high risk factors.
Ototoxic effects of occupational exposure to styrene and co-exposure to styrene and noise.
Figure 3(b) shows the startle responses versus ototoxic drug concentration.
The increasing annual frequency of 300% for new cisplatin-receiving patients who were audiologically monitored during treatment between 2006 and 2010 can be attributed to improved awareness of the ototoxic effects of cisplatin on the part of SA oncologists.
The purpose of the present investigation was to examine audiometric hearing status, while controlling for the potential confounding factors of age, sex, noise exposure, and use of ototoxic medications, in a large group of individuals with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and a control group of individuals without MS to answer the following questions: (1) Does audiometric hearing status differ between individuals with and without MS?
Hair cells are commonly lost due to chronic noise exposure, or as a result of aging, certain viral infections or exposure to ototoxic drugs.
However, this medical management may have ototoxic side-effects, which place the neonate at risk for hearing impairment.
There is also evidence that styrene is hepatotoxic and pneumotoxic (Chung, Shen, Jiang, Yuan, & Zheng, 2012; Chung, Yuan, Liu, & Zheng, 2006), it decreases reproduction capacity (Chamkhia, Sakly, & Ben Rhouma, 2006), it is ototoxic (Lawton, Hoffmann, & Triebig, 2006; Morata & Campo, 2002; Nies, 2012), and it can cause a slowdown in growth and development (Durusoy & Karababa, 2011).