otoscope

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otoscope

 [o´to-skōp]
an instrument for inspecting the ear.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·to·scope

(ō'tō-skōp),
An instrument for examining the ear.
[oto- + G. skopeō, to view]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

otoscope

(ō′tə-skōp′)
n.
An instrument for examining the interior of the ear, especially the eardrum, consisting essentially of a magnifying lens and a light.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

otoscope

A device with a light and a magnifying glass used to examine the outer ear
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

o·to·scope

(ō'tō-skōp)
An instrument for examining the drum membrane or auscultating the ear.
[oto- + G. skopeō, to view]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

otoscope

An instrument for illuminating and examining the external ear canal and the ear drum (tympanic membrane). Also known as an auriscope.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Otoscope

A hand-held instrument with a tiny light and a funnel-shaped attachment called an ear speculum, which is used to examine the ear canal and eardrum.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·to·scope

(ō'tō-skōp)
An instrument for examining the drum membrane or auscultating the ear.
[oto- + G. skopeō, to view]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The gender of 22 otoscopically sexed surplus hatchlings was evaluated definitively via dissection and matched the diagnoses from the operations in all cases.
If the child had no previous otologic history and permission was obtained, the school nurse practitioner or audiologist instilled mineral oil into the ear canal twice daily for four to five days and the ears were checked otoscopically. In some cases, instilling mineral oil into the EAC removed the cerumen, then audiometric and immittance screenings were conducted.
Many of these lesions only invade the promontory and are monitored only otoscopically. By focusing on those MEOs contacting the stapes and facial nerve, we underline the fact that their surgical treatment is highly challenging.