otolithic


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Related to otolithic: utriculus, utricles

o·to·lith·ic

(ō-tō-lith'ik),
Pertaining to otoliths.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

o·to·lith·ic

(ōtō-lithik)
Pertaining to otoliths.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the prophylaxis of Tumarkin's otolithic crisis, there is negative consensus for the usefulness of betahistine at any dosage.
Successful repositioning procedure is expected to result in reduction of disease symptoms, increase in the peak-to-peak amplitude on the affected side, leveling with the unaffected side, as well as lowering of AR after a while because some time is needed for otolith embedding in the otolithic membrane.
If the patient was not experiencing vertigo on the second position, the head used to be shaken once or twice in an attempt to free otolithic debris.
In 1998, NASA sent an oyster toadfish into space to investigate the effects of microgravity on the development of otolithic organs.
All otoliths were rinsed in water, rubbed clean to remove the otolithic membrane, placed in vials, and dried for at least seven days.
Dizziness most likely results from damage to the middle ear (vestibular apparatus), which includes the semicircular canals that respond to rotations and the otolithic organs that respond to sense linear accelerations with otoconia crystals.
The "otolithic organs," as they are known, are a pair of sensors, the utricle and the saccule, nestled in the labyrinthine architecture of the inner ear....
The contents of the inner ear are removed, including the otolithic organs, especially the utricle with its attached ampullae beneath the horizontal fallopian canal.
The otolithic involvement through the VCR causes contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, resulting in abnormal twisting of the neck (Gans, 2002b).
These are called the otolithic organs and are responsible for detecting linear acceleration, or movement in a straight line.
In particular, stimulation of the otolithic membranes of the vestibular system may lead to the incorrect identification of low frequency (below 0.5 Hz) translational forces occurring during road travel as a change in body orientation or tilting of the head with respect to gravity (Griffin, 1990).