other-directed

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oth·er-di·rect·ed

(odh'ĕr-di-rek'tĕd),
Pertaining to someone readily influenced by the attitudes of others.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

oth·er-di·rect·ed

(ŭdh'ĕr-di-rek'tĕd)
Pertaining to a person readily influenced by the attitudes of others.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
EMSs measured by the YSQ are clustered into 5 schema domains depending on the unmet emotional needs: 1) Disconnection and Rejection, 2) Impaired Autonomy and Performance, 3) Impaired Limits, 4) Other-directedness and 5) Overvigilance and Inhibition (42).
Correlated-Factors Model 80.55 26 0.98 0.97 ('Public Performing' and 'Other-Directedness') 3.
Beyond these three responses to the ethico-political question of the split in the Kantian "own"--critique, relatedness to Being, and the other-directedness of hope--what interests me most apropos of discouragement and hope is a fourth analysis of responding: the question of hope itself and its disappointability in Ernst Bloch.
In changing the story to Lily's search for mother in the novel, she moves her character from other-directedness to self-directedness, a hard turn left on the road to solace and spirituality, a move that parallels Kidd's own religious shift
Thus literature should be experienced, and a responsive and responsible reading evokes a creative transformation (be it in language, thought or ethics) through its singularity constituted in its inventiveness, its other-directedness. The intimate and highly formative relationship between the literary text and reader (or writer) serves as an ultimate proof for Attridge's basic tenet: 'literature happens.'
Industrial research and advertising, playing on our other-directedness, are geared to create new demands in an accelerating cycle of turnover and obsolescence.
The widening experiential gap between parents and their 'offspring' in contemporary society is, for Cote, a clear reminder of Margaret Mead's 'prefigurative' culture, while Riesman's concept of 'other-directedness' fulfils the subjective requirements of the author's 'culture-identity link' (pp.
Yet other than Marianne, whom we tolerate because she is seventeen and in love (but she plays the piano extremely well, which must have required much practice), and Emma, whose errors occur in the contexts of misplaced other-directedness and whom many of us love because she truly feels sorry for her errors, and she is extremely patient with and loving to her taxing father, Austen's women do not fall into the hapless and helpless category of most of today's film and novel heroines.
humanity and other-directedness, equips Inman with substantial food.
This other-directedness might be expected to result in openness to the suggestions of parents and teachers, provided that those suggestions do not run counter to the values of the peer culture, in which case the outcomes might be far less certain.
The community and social dimensions in the formation of the virtues are relatively ignored, and the limitations in the social aspect of the moral virtues by the restriction by Aquinas of other-directedness to justice alone are well brought out.
Working from this premise, the heavy hitters of mainstream 1950s scholarly punditry assured their students that an amalgam of diffuse forces, such as the "information economy," psychological "other-directedness," and an affluent and universal "consumer culture, "had replaced big business owners' rigid pursuit of maximum profits as the prime mover of U.S.