osteophyte

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osteophyte

 [os´te-o-fīt]
a bony excrescence or outgrowth.

os·te·o·phyte

(os'tē-ō-fīt),
A bony outgrowth or protuberance.
[osteo- + G. phyton, plant]

osteophyte

/os·teo·phyte/ (os´te-o-fīt″) a bony excrescence or outgrowth of bone.

osteophyte

(ŏs′tē-ə-fīt′)
n.
A small, abnormal bony outgrowth.

os′te·o·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.

osteophyte

[os′tē·əfīt]
a bony outgrowth, usually found around a joint. It is commonly seen in degenerative joint disease.

osteophyte

Orthopedics A bony bump

os·te·o·phyte

(os'tē-ō-fīt)
A bony outgrowth or protuberance.
Synonym(s): osteophyma.
[osteo- + G. phyton, plant]

osteophyte

A bony outgrowth occurring usually adjacent to an area of articular cartilage damage in a joint affected by OSTEOARTHRITIS. Osteophytes are also common around the intervertebral discs of the spine.

Osteophyte

Also referred to as bone spur, it is an outgrowth or ridge that forms on a bone.
Mentioned in: Cervical Spondylosis

osteophyte

bony outgrowth (lipping) at margins of joints affected by osteoarthritis; an aberrant healing reaction to repeated minor trauma and/or chronic inflammation

osteophyte, osteophyma

a bony excrescence; a bony outgrowth. See also exostosis, spondylosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
These categories of abnormalities can be distinguished on the basis of either regional bone loss or deposition of additional bone, as in osteophytic lipping of vertebral centra, especially in the lumbar region of skeletons of older individuals (Figures 1 [V] and 6).
Osteophytic degenerations of the vertebral column are more common on the right than the left side of the body as reported by Lipschitz et al.
On the basis of osteophytic development and abnormally compressed spinous processes, he suggested that they came from a pack dog, the pathologies having developed in response to the stress of carrying an individual load.
A minor osteoarthritic problem of the lower back region is indicated in the lumbar and sacral bones by slight osteophytic lipping of the vertebral bodies (Kenndey 1989).
The AP projection with external rotation and the nonweight-bearing Grashey position demonstrated a large osteophytic spur and subchondral sclerosis.
The impact of osteophytic and vascular calcifications on vertebral mineral density measurements in men.