osteonecrosis


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osteonecrosis

 [os″te-o-nĕ-kro´sis]
necrosis of bone due to obstruction of its blood supply.

os·te·o·ne·cro·sis

(os'tē-ō-nĕ-krō'sis),
The death of bone in mass, as distinguished from caries ("molecular death") or relatively small foci of necrosis in bone.
[osteo- + G. nekrōsis, death]

osteonecrosis

/os·teo·ne·cro·sis/ (os″te-o-nĕ-kro´sis) necrosis of a bone.

osteonecrosis

[os′tē·ō′nəkrō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, osteon + nekros, dead, osis condition
the destruction and death of bone tissue, such as from ischemia, infection, malignant neoplastic disease, or trauma. osteonecrotic, adj.

os·te·o·ne·cro·sis

(os'tē-ō-nĕ-krō'sis)
The extensive death of bone, as distinguished from caries ("molecular death") or relatively small foci of necrosis in bone.
[osteo- + G. nekrōsis, death]

osteochondrosis

group of bone disorders presenting during childhood, characterized by focal aseptic necrosis, fragmentation and distortion of overlying bone, with subsequent neo-ossification of affected area; named eponymously or topically, e.g. Freiberg's disease (of metatarsal head), Kohler's disease (of navicular), Osgood-Schlatter disease (of tibial tubercle), Sever's disease (of posterior leaflet of calcaneum (Table 1 and Table 2)
Table 1: Classifications of osteochondritis in the lower limb
Criterion 11. OC of the primary articular epiphysis (e.g. Freiberg's disease of the metatarsal head; Kohler's disease of the navicular)
2. OC of the secondary articular epiphysis (e.g. osteochondritis dissecans of the talus)
3. OC of the non-articular epiphysis (e.g. Osgood-Schlatter disease of the tibial tuberosity; Iselin's disease of the styloid process of the fifth metatarsal)
Criterion 21. Crushing apophysitis (e.g. Freiberg's disease) where the pressure of the base of the adjacent phalanx causes an 'eggshell fracture' of the affected metatarsal head
2. Traction or distraction apophysitis (e.g. Sever's disease; Iselin's disease; Osgood-Schlatter disease) where traction at the tendon insertion distracts a secondary centre of ossification from the body of the calcaneum, fifth metatarsal or tibia respectively
3. Fragmentation apophysitis (e.g. osteochondritis dissecans) in which the cortical bone overlying the enchondral defect fractures and separates to create a loose body within the joint
Two criteria may be used to classify osteochondritis:
• criterion 1 relates to the anatomical location of the enchondral ossification defect
• criterion 2 relates to the effects on the diseased bone brought about by the local forces that act on the bone.
Table 2: Presentations of osteochondritis/osteochondrosis in the leg and foot
OCSite affectedTypeAge of onset (years)
Blount's diseaseProximal tibial epiphysisUnderdevelopment of medial epiphysis1-3; 6-13
Buschke's diseaseCuneiformsOssification anomaly11-15
Freiberg's diseaseSecond/third metatarsal headCrushing OC12-18
Iselin's diseaseBase of fifth metatarsalTraction apophysitis11-15
Kohler's diseaseNavicularCrushing OC3-7
Legg-Calve-Perthe diseaseCapital femoral epiphysisTrue OC2-16
Osgood-Schlatter diseaseTibial tuberosityTrauma-related11-15
Osteochondritis dissecansTalar dome
Lateral femoral condyle of knee
Osteonecrosis12-18
Sever's diseaseCalcaneal apophysisTraction apophysitis10-14
Sinding-Larson-Johansson diseasePatellaTraction apophysitis10-14
Treve's diseaseSesamoids (1 MTPJ)True OC15-20

1 MTPJ, first metatarsophalangeal joint.

os·te·o·ne·cro·sis

(os'tē-ō-nĕ-krō'sis)
Extensive death of bone, as distinguished from caries ("molecular death").
[osteo- + G. nekrōsis, death]

osteonecrosis (os´tēōnəkrō´sis),

n the destruction and death of bone tissue. It may stem from ischemia, infection, malignant neoplastic disease, or trauma.
osteonecrosis, bisphosphonate-associated (BON)
n a condition that may develop in patients on bisphosphonate therapy in which pain, swelling and infection of soft tissue, drainage, loosening of teeth, and exposed bone may occur suddenly, usually at a previous tooth extraction site, as well as numbness and heaviness of the jaw.

osteonecrosis

necrosis of a bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteonecrosis, a disease caused by reduced blood flow to bones in the joints, is a significant side effect of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), especially in patients aged 10 to 20 years.
17) While percutaneous pinning may be the least invasive method of operative fixation and therefore provides a theoretically lower chance of osteonecrosis, it carries potential complications of pin migration and osteomyelitis.
MRONJ is painful and difficult to treat While osteonecrosis of the jaw has been recognized by dental and medical practitioners for many years, the identification of bisphosphonates as a contributory factor to the condition was first reported by oral and maxillofacial surgeons about 10 years ago when they noticed an increase in the number of patients exhibiting the signs of ONJ.
In our practice of hip or knee magnetic resonance examinations, it is uncommon to come across osteonecrosis in BD patients evaluated for either joint disease symptoms or extremity pain.
Clinically, spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial tibial plateau (SOMTP) is frequently confused with medial eniscus tear and pes anserine bursitis.
At Johns Hopkins she was appointed to the position of Director for the Center for Osteonecrosis Research and Education and Technical Director of the Arthritis Surgery Bone Bank.
1) this entity has become a distinct form of osteonecrosis with typical clinical and radiological patterns.
The most common adverse reactions resulting in discontinuation of XGEVA were osteonecrosis and hypocalcemia.
Although relatively rare (< 1%-13%), osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) can be seen in patients receiving IV bisphosphonates, particularly zoledronic acid and occasionally denosumab (Coleman et al.
Radiographs showed osteonecrosis of lunate and proximal scaphoid.
Just over 1% of the women treated with zoledronic acid developed osteonecrosis of the jaw (17/1 681), an unexpectedly high incidence of a well-known and serious side-effect.
She was later diagnosed with Osteonecrosis, traumatic interruption of the blood supply to the bone, which will take two to three years to repair.