malignant external otitis

(redirected from osteomyelitis of the temporal bone)

malignant external otitis

a life-threatening Pseudomonas osteomyelitis of the temporal bone in old people with diabetes that begins with ear pain and swelling of and discharge from the external auditory canal.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

necrotising external otitis

Otitis externa accompanied by osteomyelitis and bone erosion, which often arises in a background of Pseudomonas otitis in patients who are elderly, diabetic and/or immunocompromised.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ma·lig·nant ex·ter·nal o·ti·tis

(mă-lig'nănt eks-tĕr'nălō-tī'tis)
A life-threatening Pseudomonas osteomyelitis of the temporal bone in elderly people with diabetes that begins with ear pain and swelling of and discharge from the external auditory canal.
Synonym(s): Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chalasani, "Osteomyelitis of the temporal bone: terminology, diagnosis, and management," Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base, vol.
Osteomyelitis of the temporal bone is a rare but life-threatening complication that is mostly secondary to malignant otitis externa (MOE) and was first recognized as a distinct clinical entity by Meltzer and Kelemen in 1959 [1].
This was a retrospective review of the charts of 55 hospitalized patients with diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone who were treated in the Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, from January 1990 to December 2011.
During the study period, a total of 55 patients with the diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone were treated at our institution.
In the past, osteomyelitis of the temporal bone was seen as mostly caused by and secondary to MOE that was characterized by severe swelling in EAC and granulation tissue in the floor of the ear canal at the bony-cartilaginous junction [2, 8, 11].
The epidemiology of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone has also changed in the past 10 years.
A direct extension of the mucosal disease can lead to mastoiditis or tuberculous osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. Periauricular fistulas, lymphadenopathy, and facial palsy are infrequent findings.
Osteomyelitis of the temporal bone in identical twin infants
The most severe consequence of this was the development of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone that leads to the formation of a cerebellar abscess.
Fungal osteomyelitis of the temporal bone: A review of reported cases.
A direct extension of the mucosal disease can lead to mastoiditis or tuberculous osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. Associated facial nerve paralysis is seen in approximately 16% of adult cases and 35% of pediatric cases.
The serious complications of this disease are osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, sinus thrombosis, and septicemia; some cases are fatal.