osteomalacia


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Related to osteomalacia: Paget's disease

osteomalacia

 [os″te-o-mah-la´shah]
softening of the bones, resulting from impaired mineralization, with excess accumulation of osteoid, caused by a vitamin D deficiency in adults. A similar condition in children is called rickets. The deficiency may be due to lack of exposure to ultraviolet rays, inadequate intake of vitamin D in the diet, or failure to absorb or utilize vitamin D. There is decalcification of the bones, particularly those of the spine, pelvis, and lower extremities. X-ray examination reveals transverse, fracture-like lines in the affected bones and areas of demineralization in the matrix of the bone. As the bones soften they become bent, flattened, or otherwise deformed. Treatment consists of administration of large daily doses of vitamin D and dietary measures to insure adequate calcium and phosphorus intake. adj., adj osteomala´cic.
antacid-induced osteomalacia osteomalacia in which the combination of low dietary phosphorus intake and chronic excessive consumption of aluminum hydroxide–containing antacids has led to phosphate depletion; characteristics include hypophosphatemia, nephrolithiasis, anorexia, muscle weakness, and bone loss.
anticonvulsant osteomalacia
1. osteomalacia occurring in anticonvulsant rickets of children.
hepatic osteomalacia osteomalacia as a complication of cholestatic liver disease, which may lead to severe bone pain and multiple fractures.
oncogenic osteomalacia a type seen in association with usually benign mesenchymal neoplasms. The tumors appear to produce a substance that impairs renal tubular functions and leads to hypophosphatemia. Called also tumor-induced osteomalacia.
puerperal osteomalacia a type resulting from exhaustion of skeletal stores of calcium and phosphorus by repeated pregnancies and lactation.
renal tubular osteomalacia a type resulting from acidosis and hypercalciuria when deficient renal tubular activity has caused inability to produce acid urine or ammonia.
senile osteomalacia softening of bones in old age due to vitamin D deficiency.
tumor-induced osteomalacia oncogenic osteomalacia.

os·te·o·ma·la·ci·a

(os'tē-ō-mă-lā'shē-ă),
A disease in adults characterized by a gradual softening and bending of the bones with varying severity of pain; softening occurs because the bones contain osteoid tissue that has failed to calcify because of lack of vitamin D or renal tubular dysfunction; more common in women than in men, osteomalacia often begins during pregnancy.
[osteo- + G. malakia, softness]

osteomalacia

(ŏs′tē-ō-mə-lā′shə, -shē-ə)
n.
A bone disease in adults analogous to rickets in children, marked by bone demineralization caused by impaired metabolism or deficiency of vitamin D or phosphorus.

osteomalacia

Nutritional rickets A condition characterized by softened bones due to poor mineralization occurring in a background of vitamin D deficiency Clinical Weak, deformed, and deformable bone, which in children may be manifest by craniotabes, bowlegs, and knock knees, rachitic rosary, ↓ ventilation, often accompanied by pneumonia, muscular weakness, ↓ appetite, hypocalcemia Treatment Vitamin D. See Osteogenic osteomalacia, Rickets.

os·te·o·ma·la·ci·a

(os'tē-ō-mă-lā'shē-ă)
A disease characterized by a gradual softening and bending of the bones with varying severity of pain; softening occurs because the bones contain osteoid tissue which has failed to calcify due to lack of vitamin D or renal tubular dysfunction.
Synonym(s): adult rickets, late rickets.
[osteo- + G. malakia, softness]

osteomalacia

Bone softening as a result of defective mineralization, usually occurring because of defective calcium absorption from vitamin D deficiency. Osteomalacia is commoner in women than in men. The softened bones may distort or bend under the body weight. The condition is treated with vitamin D.

Osteomalacia

Osteomalacia is a bone disease that occurs in adults and is caused by a prolonged period of vitamin D deficiency.

os·te·o·ma·la·ci·a

(os'tē-ō-mă-lā'shē-ă)
Disease in adults characterized by a gradual softening and bending of bones with varying severity of pain.
Synonym(s): adult rickets.
[osteo- + G. malakia, softness]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, bisphosphonates are contraindicated in patients with osteomalacia, as they could exacerbate hypocalcemia and interfere with skeletal remineralization.
Parfitt, "Osteomalacia due to vitamin D depletion: a neglected consequence of intestinal malabsorption," The American Journal of Medicine, vol.
In this time, we experienced the case of insufficiency fracture in medial proximal tibia of the knee, which was caused by 2-year intravenous SFO administration induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia.
Tumor-induced osteomalacia typically occurs in adults, with equal gender distribution [10].
[21] Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry scanning (DEXA) shows low bone density, plain radiography reflect osteopenia or osteomalacia. [22]
Striking pathology gold: A singular experience with daily reverberations: Sinonasal hemangiopericytoma (glomangiopericytoma) and oncogenic osteomalacia. Head Neck Pathol 2012; 6 (1): 64-74.
One unrestrained study established that patients by means of hypovitaminosis D-instigated osteomalacia had change in their electromyogram however not nerve conduction speed amid parenteral vitamin D treatment for a while, proposing that vitamin D assumes an etiological part [19].
Hypophosphatemia (low phosphorus in the blood) may be observed in hyperparathyroidism, Fanconni anemia (a genetic defect affecting the proximal tubules), vitamin D deficiency causing rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults, chronic use of antacids which bind phosphates in the intestine, chronic alcoholism, malabsorption syndrome, and sometimes associated with administration of hyperalimentation fluids.
Deficiency of this vitamin causes growth retardation and rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults and can precipitate and exacerbate osteopenia or osteoporosis and increase the risk of fracture in adults.
Suboptimal vitamin D in the blood also causes poor bone calcification, leading to a softening of bones (rickets in children, osteomalacia in adults), osteoporosis, and increased fractures.
Left untreated, Vitamin D deficiency can pose serious health risks that include rickets and osteomalacia, a condition that causes softening of the bones.