resorption

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Related to osteoclastic resorption: ruffled border

resorption

 [re-sorp´shun]
1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone.
Alveolor Resorption of the alveolar bone in periodontitis. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn),
1. The act of resorbing.
2. A loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn)
1. The act of resorbing.
2. A loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

resorption

the taking back into an organism of any structure or secretion produced.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn)
Loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteoporosis is a kind of metabolic disorders characterized by the imbalance between osteoblastic formation and osteoclastic resorption. It is a stealthy and unpredictable disease that does not become symptomatic until the advanced stages, thus termed a "silent killer" (Kanis et al.
Apart from inhibition of osteoclastic resorption, they have also been shown to suppress proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, TNF-alpha and IL-6.
The remodeling process in bone multi-cellular units is initiated by osteoclastic resorption. However, since osteoclast formation and activation are controlled by osteoblasts (covering the bone surfaces), the most initial phase consists of the catabolic activation of osteoblasts.
During osteoclastic resorption of the organic matrix, Dpd is released into circulation and is subsequently excreted in the urine in free and peptide-bound forms.
Osteoclastic resorption produces irregular scalloped cavities on the trabecular bone surface, called Howship lacunae, or cylindrical Haversian canals in cortical bone.

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