osteochondromatosis

osteochondromatosis

 [os″te-o-kon-dro″mah-to´-sis]
the occurrence of multiple osteochondromas.

he·red·i·tar·y mul·ti·ple ex·os·to·ses

[MIM*133700]
a disturbance of endochondral bone growth in which multiple, generally benign osteochondromas of long bones appear during childhood, commonly with shortening of the radius and fibula; the skull is not involved; the ill effects are usually mechanical but malignant change is rare; autosomal dominant inheritance with genetic heterogeneity. Type I is caused by a mutation in the exostosis-1 gene (EXT1) on 8q, type II is due to mutation in the exostosis-2 gene (EXT2) and type III maps to 19p.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pyogenic arthritis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, hemophilic arthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, osteochondromatosis, and neoplasms should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with elbow involvement (15).
Radiologically, it is characterized by the presence of hyperostosis foci at any point in the skeleton, and associated with numerous disorders including Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, ankylosing spondylitis, synovial osteochondromatosis, Klippel-Feil syndrome, cleft palate, Familial Mediterranean fever, endocrine diseases, syndactyly, and melorheostosis.
(57) Synovial chondromatosis is termed synovial osteochondromatosis if the intraarticular bodies are mineralized.
In our case, there was no free body in the bursa and no palpable induration on the bursal wall that would have indicated chondrometaplasia or secondary osteochondromatosis. Traces of direct contact between the lesion and the ribs were apparent, and the bursa was formed between the serratus anterior and the chest wall.
Synovial chondromatosis [1] also known as synovial osteochondromatosis is a type of non-cancerous tumour arising from the intimal layer of synovial membrane of a joint.
This tumor can be formed by one or more masses; in the latter case, it is referred to an osteochondromatosis or multiple cartilaginous exostoses (ROSA & KIRBERGER, 2012).
Natural history of multiple hereditary osteochondromatosis of the lower extremity and ankle.
SC or osteochondromatosis (when ossification is present), also called Reichel's syndrome, was first described by Reichel in 1900.[sup][3] The etiology of this disorder is still unclear.
Multiple osteochondromatosis (MO) is a rare genetic disorder associated with serious complications that may significantly affect the health-related quality of life of anyone having the disorder.
Other entities that can have similar imaging findings and that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Tumoral Calcinosis include: Calcinosis Universalis, Calcinosis Cirumscripta, Calcific Tendonitis, Synovial Osteochondromatosis, Synovial Sarcoma, Osteosarcoma, Myossitis Ossificans, Tophaceous Gout and Calcific Myonecrosis.
Synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is a rare and benign monoarticular arthropathy characterized by multi-nodular cartilaginous proliferation in the synovium of the joint, tendon sheath or bursa.
Case report: A rare condition of secondary synovial osteochondromatosis of the shoulder joint in a young female patient.