osteoblastoma


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Related to osteoblastoma: osteochondroma, enchondroma, chondroblastoma

osteoblastoma

 [os″te-o-blas-to´mah]
a benign, painful, rather vascular tumor of bone marked by formation of osteoid tissue and primitive bone.

os·te·o·blas·to·ma

(os'tē-ō-blas-tō'mă),
An uncommon benign tumor of osteoblasts with areas of osteoid and calcified tissue, occurring most frequently in the spine of a young person.

osteoblastoma

A bone lesion which is traditionally defined as a benign tumour of highly vascularised osteoblastic stroma, which is most common between age 5 and 25, and often located in vertebrae.
 
DiffDx
• Osteoid osteoma: Osteoblastomas are larger (over 2 cm in diameter), more axial in location, and lack imaging appearance of OOs.
• Osteosarcoma: Osteoblastomas are non-invasive, lack cartilage, have an osteosclerotic rim and looser cellularity.
• Pseudomalignant osteoblastoma: Osteoblastomas lack plump osteoblasts with “ancient change”—large nuclei with smudged nuclei.

os·te·o·blas·to·ma

(os'tē-ō-blas-tō'mă)
An uncommon benign tumor of osteoblasts with areas of osteoid and calcified tissue, occurring most frequently in the spine of a young person.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggressive osteoblastoma of the temporal bone: An unusual cause of facial palsy.
The most common symptom in patients with osteoblastoma is local pain that is relieved partially with analgesics.
The abundance of reactive, woven bone in primary bone PH can make its distinction from osteoblastoma difficult because the quantity of the bone can obscure the neoplastic cells.
Osteoblastomas have very similar clinical and radiographic findings, but tooth-mass continuity does not exist.
Osteoblastoma: It constitutes less than 1% of bone tumours and occurs in patients between 10 and 30 years of age with male predominance.
Histopathologically, the periphery of the cementum-like tissue presents more active growth, and sometimes, resembles osteoblastoma, osteoid osteoma, or atypical osteosarcoma, which are not distinctively related to tooth roots, and may be difficult to distinguish from these tumors [3, 5].
Inflammatory (a) Orbital cellulitis 5 20% (b) Orbital apex syndrome 1 4% (c) Frontal mucocele 1 4% (d) Mucormycosis 1 4% Pleomorphic adenoma of lacrimal gland 1 4% Pseudotumours 2 8% Trauma (retrobulbar haemorrhage) 1 4% Hodgkin's lymphoma 1 4% Squamous cell carcinoma 3 12% Lacrimal gland adenocarcinoma 1 4% Osteoblastoma 1 4% Meningioma 1 4% Haemangioma 1 4% Acoustic schwannoma 1 4% Retinoblastoma 1 4% Lymphangioma 1 4% Dermoid 1 4% Luxated globe 1 4% Table 5: Treatment modalities.
The histologic diagnoses for the four remaining cases were plasmacytoma, osteoblastoma, transient bone marrow oedema, and degenerative sternoclavicular osteoarthritis.
Dudakovic et al., "Hypoxia-related microRNA-210 is a diagnostic marker for discriminating osteoblastoma and osteosarcoma," Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 2016.
Differential diagnoses include necrotic primary adenoma with significant intrasellar extension, craniopharyngioma, chordoma, plasmacytoma, osteoma, osteoblastoma, basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, rhinolitis, polyps, and fibrous dysplasia [5].