ossify

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ossify

 [os´ĭ-fi]
to change or develop into bone.

os·si·fy

(os'i-fī),
To form bone or convert into bone.
[ossi- + L. facio, to make]

ossify

(ŏs′ə-fī′)
v. ossi·fied, ossi·fying, ossi·fies
v.intr.
1. To change into bone; become bony.
2. To become set in a rigidly conventional pattern: "The central ideas of liberalism have ossified" (Jeffrey Hart).
v.tr.
1. To convert (a membrane or cartilage, for example) into bone.
2. To mold into a rigidly conventional pattern.

os·sif′ic (ŏ-sĭf′ĭk) adj.

ossify

[os′ifī]
Etymology: L, os, bone, facere, to make
to develop into bone.

ossify

verb To change into bone

os·si·fy

(os'i-fī)
To form bone or convert into bone.
[ossi- + L. facio, to make]

os·si·fy

(os'i-fī)
To form bone or convert into bone.
[ossi- + L. facio, to make]

ossify (os´ifī),

v to transform from soft tissue to hardened bone.

ossify

to change or develop into bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
0] As explained above, although many other taxa may have an ossified 'ligament between the posttemporal and the posterior margin of the neurocranium', their posttemporal is not peculiarly bifurcated anteroventrolaterally in a shorter, lateral arm carrying a sensorial canal and a longer, mesial arm that corresponds to the ossified 'ligament between posttemporal and posterior margin of neurocranium' of the present work.
Vertebral column At hatching, all neural and haemal spines are present and ossified (Table 2).
Elongated styloid process and ossified stylohyoid complexes are reported entities.
With the album all but dead, radio having collapsed into a heap of ossified formats, and the Internet increasing competition and cutting attention spans, making it as a musician is even less likely now than it was just a decade ago.
What does the future hold for this ossified conflict?
This middle ear connection, also known as the ossified Meckel's cartilage, resembles the embryonic condition of living mammals and the primitive middle ear of pre-mammalian ancestors.
IN 1918, new dad Thomas Button abandons his baby, disgusted that he looks like an old man, with ossified bones and wrinkled skin.
Yet the myth that he was in charge, which began during his lifetime, ossified into schoolbook history.
Any further progress toward understanding the most fundamental constituents of the universe will require physicists to abandon the now ossified ideology" of string theory, writes Woit.