ossification


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ossification

 [os″ĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
formation of or conversion into bone or a bony substance.
ectopic ossification a pathological condition in which bone arises in tissues not in the osseous system and in connective tissues usually not manifesting osteogenic properties.
endochondral ossification ossification that occurs in and replaces cartilage.
heterotrophic ossification metaplastic ossification.
intramembranous ossification ossification of bone that occurs in and replaces connective tissue.
metaplastic ossification the development of bony substance in normally soft body structures; called also heterotrophic ossification.

os·si·fi·ca·tion

(os'i-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. The formation of bone.
2. A change into bone.
[L. ossificatio, fr. os, bone, + facio, to make]

ossification

/os·si·fi·ca·tion/ (os″ĭ-fĭ-ka´shun) formation of or conversion into bone or a bony substance.
ectopic ossification  a pathological condition in which bone arises in tissues not in the osseous system and in connective tissues usually not manifesting osteogenic properties.
endochondral ossification  ossification that occurs in and replaces cartilage.
heterotopic ossification  the formation of bone in abnormal locations, secondary to pathology.
intramembranous ossification  ossification that occurs in and replaces connective tissue.

ossification

(ŏs′ə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. The natural process of bone formation.
2.
a. The hardening or calcification of soft tissue into a bonelike material.
b. A mass or deposit of such material.
3.
a. The process of becoming set in a rigidly conventional pattern, as of behavior, habits, or beliefs.
b. Rigid, unimaginative convention.

ossification

[os′ifikā′shən]
Etymology: L, os + facere, to make
the development of bone. Intramembranous ossification is that preceded by membrane, such as in the process initially forming the roof and sides of the skull. Intracartilaginous endochondral ossification is that preceded by rods of cartilage, such as that forming the bones of the limbs.
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Ossification

os·si·fi·ca·tion

(os'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. The formation of bone.
2. A change into bone.
[L. ossificatio, fr. os, bone, + facio, to make]

ossification

(os?i-fi-ka'shun) [? + facere, to make]
1. The formation of bone matrix.
2. The replacement of other tissue by bone, esp. during fetal development. See: osteogenesis
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ENDOCHONDRAL OSSIFICATION: Ossification process in a long bone; (A) progression from embryo to young adult, (B) microscopic view of an epiphyseal disk
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ENDOCHONDRAL OSSIFICATION

endochondral ossification

The formation of bone in cartilage, as in the formation of long bones, involving the destruction and removal of cartilage and the formation of osseous tissue in the space formerly occupied by the cartilage. See: illustration
illustration

intramembranous ossification

The formation of bone in or underneath a fibrous membrane, such as occurs in the formation of the cranial bones.

pathologic ossification

The formation of bone in abnormal sites or abnormal development of bone.

periosteal ossification

The formation of successive thin layers of bone by osteoblasts between the underlying bone or cartilage and the cellular and fibrous layer that covers the forming bone. Also called subperiosteal ossification.

ossification

The process of conversion of other tissues into bone. Most bone forms from CARTILAGE but some is laid down by other connective tissue (membranous bone). Ossification may also occur in tissues that have been the site of disease such as long-term inflammation.

ossification

bone formation which replaces another structure such as cartilage.

os·si·fi·ca·tion

(os'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. The formation of bone.
2. A change into bone.
[L. ossificatio, fr. os, bone, + facio, to make]

ossification

formation of or conversion into bone or a bony substance.

biceps brachii ossification
causes a progressive lameness of the shoulder joint of the horse. The calcification of the tendon can be identified radiologically.
ossification center
a locus in an epiphysis or other part of a bone at which ossification commences and from which it spreads over the entire section. Radiological examination can detect the appearance of each ossification center and this is of assistance in aging.
dural ossification
occurs in large and giant breed dogs. Detected radiographically, most commonly in the lumbar and cranial and caudal cervical areas, but rarely produces clinical signs. Called also ossifying pachymeningitis.
ectopic ossification
see ectopic mineralization.
enchondral ossification
ossification that occurs in and replaces cartilage.
ossification groove
located at the physeal end of the perichondrial ring of long bones. It supplies chondrocytes to the physis for the diametric growth of the bone. Called also groove of Ranvier.
intramembranous ossification
the formation of bone directly from fibrous tissue without the use of a cartilaginous model, e.g. as occurs in the parietal and frontal bones.
lateral cartilage ossification
retarded enchondral ossification
the ossification of cartilage in growing large dogs may be retarded and, at the distal ulnar growth plate, resembles premature closure of the plate; the characteristic lesion is a cone of uncalcified cartilage in the growth plate.

Patient discussion about ossification

Q. is their any way to cure osteogenesis imperfecta my son has this bone disorder and can;t stand to see him cry thank you for any help

A. as far as i know- OI is a genetic problem. today there is no cure to genetic problems. there is a big research on gene therapy but there's a long long road before we will see any result..sorry... but there are several treatments that can ease your son's pain, here is a wonderful site that stores a vast amount of information about IO, including recent studies and researches:
http://www.oif.org/site/PageServer

More discussions about ossification
References in periodicals archive ?
4) Enthesopathy adjacent to peripheral joints is common, and sites, such as the distal clavicle, greater and lesser tubercles, pelvis, tibial spine, heel, patella, and olecranon, have been identified as locations of increased calcification and ossification in DISH.
The frequency and treatment of dural tears and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 266 patients with thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the ligamentum flavum.
Ossification of ligamentum flavum, although commonly seen in aging Japanese population, is rare in Caucasian people and Americans.
To our knowledge, there are no reports describing heterotopic ossification occurring secondary to a gunshot wound in birds.
Heterotopic mesenteric ossification (HMO) is a rare bone-producing alteration that tafees place in the mesentery.
A new concept for making decisions regarding the surgical approach for cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: the K-line," Spine, vol.
Finally, we want to avoid conflating the notion of regulatory ossification with delays from litigation.
The ossification is observed in the medial and posterior regions of the basal plate, which correspond to basisphenoid, basioccipital and exoccipital.
During embryonic development, ossification begins at the 5th week with the appearance of two primary centres of ossification, a medial and a lateral centre in the shaft of the clavicle, which fuse at about the 6th week [10-11].
The design rationale of the Struxxure ACP system is based on published papers highlighting studies reporting the incidence of adjacent level ossification significantly decreases when the plate-to-disc distance is greater than 5millimeters from the adjacent level.