auditory ossicles

(redirected from ossicular chain)

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

[TA]
the small bones of the middle ear; they are articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.

auditory ossicles

Etymology: L, audire + ossiculum, little bone
the malleus, the incus, and the stapes, three small bones in the middle ear that articulate with each other. As the tympanic membrane vibrates, it transmits sound waves through the ossicles to the cochlea.
enlarge picture
Auditory ossicles

auditory ossicles

The 3 diminutive bones of the middle ear. The malleus is attached to the inner face of the tympanic membrane at the manubrium and articulates at its head with the body of the incus; the incus in turn articulates at its lenticular process with the head of the stapes; the stapes is attached at its base by a ligamentous ring to the oval window of the vestibule. Sound waves channelled though the external acoustic canal (auditory duct) to the tympanic membrane are amplified by the auditory ossicles.

The vibrations received at the oval window are passed down the cochlea; the relative movement of the basilar and tectorial membranes leads to deflection of the stereocilia of the hair cells in the organ of Corti, which generates an influx of K+ ions and production of electrical signals that travel via the cochlear nerve to the auditory complex.

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

(aw'di-tōr-ē os'i-kĕlz) [TA]
The small bones of the middle ear; they are articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
Synonym(s): ossicula auditus [TA] , ear bones.

auditory ossicles

The chain of three tiny bone in the middle ear which acts as an impedance transformer, efficiently coupling the relatively large low-impedance movement of the ear drum to the smaller, high-impedance movement of the fluid in the cochlea of the inner ear.

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

(aw'di-tōr-ē os'i-kĕlz) [TA]
Small bones of middle ear articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
Synonym(s): ear bones.

auditory

pertaining to the ear or the sense of hearing.

auditory apparatus
comprises the tympanic membrane, the auditory ossicles that connect the membrane to the oval window to the internal ear, the membranous labyrinth and its contained endolymph, the labyrinth's cochlear duct, the organ of Corti, a specialized sensory epithelium lining the duct, the sensory hair cells of the organ of Corti and the sensory receptors of the auditory nerve that terminate at the base of the hair cells.
auditory bulb
the membranous labyrinth and cochlea.
auditory conditioning signals
sounds used to condition animals to certain procedures or events, such as gathering at the sound of a bell or trumpet, milking to the sound of a radio, whistle signals to a sheep dog.
external auditory meatus
air-filled tubular extension of the auricle leading to the eardrum.
internal auditory meatus
a canal in the petrous temporal bone that accommodates the VIIth and VIIIth cranial nerves.
auditory nerve
the eighth cranial nerve; called also vestibulocochlear nerve and acoustic nerve. See Table 14.
auditory ossicles
the malleus, incus and stapes, the three small bones of the tympanic cavity of the ear. They form a connecting bony system from the tympanic membrane to the oval window that is the opening to the internal ear.
auditory tube
the narrow channel connecting the nasopharynx to the middle ear. See also pharyngotympanic tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of cartilage in middle ear surgery was first reported by Utech in 1959 as an interpositional graft between the stapes and tympanic membrane in the reconstruction of the ossicular chain.
Transient or permanent hearing loss or tinnitus occurs due to blast-related ear damage to the sensitive structures of the inner and middle ear, such as the cochlea, ossicular chain, TM and vestibular system.
It is, however, often recognized during the operation that tympanoplasty can be technically more difficult in elderly patients than in younger patients because of severe middle ear conditions, including mucosal inflammation, tympanosclerosis, and destruction of the ossicular chain.
Objective: Chronic otitis media most commonly causes an ossicular chain defect in incus.
Information regarding ossicular chain erosion, erosion of LSSC and fallopian canal can also be appreciated by HRCT.
Once early medical intervention is not performed OM might cause a hearing loss due to accumulated fluid in the middle ear, which difficult the transmission of sound vibrations through the ossicular chain, causing loss energy of sound.
The pre-operative CT scans were reported to assess characteristic cholesteatoma findings, location and extension of soft tissues in middle ear, integrity of scutum, erosion of the ossicular chain, integrity of the thin bony septum of facial nerve canal, the semicircular canals and the tegmenextension of cholesteatoma outside the middle ear, integrity of mastoid air cells, trabeculae, as well as relationship and proximity of soft tissues with the tympanic membrane were assessed.
According to the loss outcomes of ossicles, the ossicular chain was reconstructed and artificial ossicles were fixed by antibiotic gelatin sponges (Fig.
Conductive hearing loss originating from the middle ear can occur from traumatic injury to the ossicular chain or dampening of sound vibrations from soft tissue or fluid in the middle ear cavity.
HRCT provided useful information for cholesteatoma operating surgeon as degree of ventilation/opacification of middle ear cleft from the Eustachian tube to the mastoid tip, erosion of ossicular chain, access to the epitympanum as determined by the level of the dura laterally, development/cellularity/ sclerosis of the mastoid cortex, dehiscence of the tegmen, erosion of the labyrinth, especially the lateral semicircular canal and status of the facial nerve.
Blast-related ear injuries often present as damage to the sensitive structures of the inner and middle ear, such as the cochlea, ossicular chain, tympanic membrane (TM), and vestibular system [5,13-14].