osculum

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osculum

 [os´ku-lum]
a minute opening.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

os·cu·lum

, pl.

os·cu·la

(os'kyū-lŭm, -lă),
A pore or minute opening.
[L. dim. of os, mouth]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

os·cu·lum

, pl. oscula (os'kyū-lŭm, -lă)
A pore or minute opening.
[L. dim. of os, mouth]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

osculum

the large aperture in sponges through which water passes out.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
The double entendre becomes even more explicit with the elaborate reference to lips and kissing: "labris oscula" (7)--with a possible pun on labrum, also meaning "a vat for treading out grapes"--and "Dulcia compressis basia buccis" (8).
Inter profundae laetitiae sonos, Sunt quas amarus flere jubet dolor, Optata non illas salutant Oscula, nec tenerae loqulae.
Videt igne micantes / sideribus similes oculos, vider oscula, quae non / est vidisse satis; laudat digitosque manusque / bracchiaque et nudos media plus parte lacertos; si qua latent, meliora putat" (our citation is from the Loeb edition, 1977, 1:36).
According to the Roman poet, the wakening maiden blushes upon receiving Pygmalion's kisses: "dataque oscula virgo / sensit et erubuit" (X, 292-93).
Dimotaque venit spectanda Scientia nube, nudaque conspicuos inclinat ad oscula vultus, ni fugisse velim, ni sit libasse molestum.
Aemilius Baehrens observed that the passer is a surrogate for Lesbia's absent lover: verba autem in sinu tenere porroque acris incitare morsus facile in animum vocant imaginem amatoris puellae suae iocis blanditiisque in fervida oscula acrisque lusus incitati, passer igitur absentis amasii partes apud Lesbiam explet(8) (`Now the words in sinu tenere and acris incitare morsus easily call to mind the image of the lover excited by the wit and charm of his girl to fervid kisses and spirited play.
flebis et arsuro positum me, Delia, lecto, tristibus et lacrimis oscula mixta dabis.
In Metamorphoses 10, when the ivory statue becomes mortal, we are told she blushes at Pygmalion's kiss: "dataque oscula virgo/sensit et erubuit |The maiden felt the kisses and blushed~" (292-93).