os trigonum


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os tri·go·num

[TA]
an independent ossicle sometimes present in the tarsus; usually it forms part of the talus, constituting the lateral tubercle of the posterior process.
Synonym(s): triangular bone

os tri·go·num

(os trī-gō'nŭm) [TA]
An independent ossicle sometimes present in the tarsus; usually it forms part of the talus, constituting the lateral tubercle of the posterior process.
Synonym(s): triangular bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Se analizaron de forma retrospectiva 205 radiografias bilaterales de pie lateral, tobillo lateral y calcaneo lateral en la base de datos "Synapse" de pacientes que concurrieron al Hospital Hernan Henriquez Aravena (HHHA) de Temuco entre el periodo de agosto de 2017 a mayo de 2018 para determinar la presencia o no del Os trigonum. A su vez se realizaron mediciones del ancho y longitud de este hueso accesorio.
Specific findings during the surgeries included three cases of a duplicate os trigonum and three cases of a tendon ganglion of the FHL.
An os trigonum is a small bony ossicle located posterior to the talus.
Sol ayak bilegi lateral radyografisinde os trigonum goruldu (Sekil 1).
(3) Variations in normal osseous and soft-tissue anatomy that predispose one to PAI syndrome include a prominent down-slope of the posterior tibia, the presence of an os trigonum, a prominent posterior-talar process (Stieda process), (3) prominent tuberosity arising from the superior calcaneum, (3) and the presence of the posterior-intermalleolar ligament (PIML).
(6) However, impressed by the endoscopic overview of the hindfoot pathology and the resulting insights into the intimate relationship between the os trigonum and the FHL tendon, and after extensive training, the endoscopic approach was adopted as standard treatment in our clinic in 2002.
An os trigonum is usually round or oval with well-defined corticated margins, whereas a fracture of the lateral tubercle typically has irregular serrated margins between the fragment and the posterior talus.
Our search criteria encompassed anatomy (e.g., ankle, talo-crural, talus, os trigonum, Stieda's process, flexor hallucis longus), type of injury (primarily ankle impingement, tendinitis, tendinopathy, Shepherd's fracture, and trigger toe), and type of activity (dance).
Os trigonums, especially small ones, rarely need surgery, although that's not even a big deal since an endoscope the size of a drinking straw removes the bone.
(19-21) Stenosing tenosynovitis can also be associated with an os trigonum. (22,23) Tears of the FHL and FDL tendons are rare and have the same pathology as tendons elsewhere.
Cramped toes can occur for any number of reasons, such as muscle weakness, an os trigonum (an extra bone in the back of the ankle), an electrolyte imbalance, or mineral deficiency.