orthoptics

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orthoptics

 [or-thop´tiks]
treatment of strabismus by exercise of the ocular muscles.

or·thop·tics

(ōr-thop'tiks),
The study and treatment of defective binocular vision, of defects in the action of the ocular muscles, or of faulty visual habits.
[ortho- straightened + G. optikos, sight]

orthoptics

(ôr-thŏp′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The evaluation and nonsurgical treatment of visual disorders caused by imbalance of the eye muscles, such as strabismus.

or·thop′tic adj.
or·thop′tist n.

vision therapy

A clinical approach for correcting and ameliorating the effects of eye movement disorders, non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions, focusing disorders, strabismus, amblyopia, nystagmus and certain visual perceptual (information processing) disorders.

Alternative ophthalmology
A vision-enhancing method developed in the 1920s by an American optometrist, AM Skeffington. Vision therapy uses eye exercises and other techniques to retrain the eyes to function as a unit, and co-ordinate the brain’s processing of visual information needed for binocular vision; it is allegedly useful for lazy eye (amblyopia), crossed eyes (strabismus), problems of focusing (vergence and accommodation), oculomotor defects, learning disabilities, athletic performance and traumatic brain injury. While vision therapy may be of use in developing stereoscopic skills and improving visual field remnants after brain damage, there is no clear scientific evidence supporting the use of eye exercises to improve vision.

or·thop·tics

(ōr-thop'tiks)
The study and treatment of defective binocular vision, of defects in the action of the ocular muscles, or of faulty visual habits.
[ortho- straightened + G. optikos, sight]

orthoptics

A discipline, ancillary to OPHTHALMOLOGY, concerned mainly with the management of squint (STRABISMUS) in childhood and the avoidance of AMBLYOPIA. See also ORTHOPTIST.

orthoptics 

The study, diagnosis and nonoperative treatment of anomalies of binocular vision, strabismus and monocular functional amblyopia. See visual training.
References in periodicals archive ?
Orthoptist Aman Mann, said: "There are lots of different abilities among the team but we are all up for the challenge and are taking a really good team spirit to the top of Snowdon.
Yong Ern Lim, B.Hlth.Sc., M.Orth., orthoptist and honours student, Department of Clinical Vision Sciences, Department of Clinical Vision Sciences, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086, Australia; e-mail: <lye0128@ ymail.com>.
Andrew Fox, the hospital's head orthoptist (eye specialist) said: " Having normal sight is something you take for granted until things happen to affect it.
Orthoptist Mark Jones, who worked at Warrington Hospital between 1990 and 2007, was given a one-year suspension for poor record keeping and failing to carry out the right eye examinations by a Health Professions Council (HPC).
The judgment was made yesterday on orthoptist Mark Jones, who worked at Warrington Hospital between 1990 and 2007.
[1.] Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine of American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Ophthalmology of American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association of Certified Orthoptists, American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus and American Academy of Ophthalmology.
At the hospital orthoptists work closely with consultant ophthalmologists and optometrists to diagnose, treat and manage a variety of eye problems in childhood and adulthood.
* A 5% per year pay rise for all public health system nurses and midwives, bringing nurses' pay into line with other health professionals with similar experience, such as physiotherapists, diversional therapists, orthoptists and exercise physiologists;
But staff at the Children's Eye Clinic at Newcastle's Royal Victoria Infirmary (RVI) yesterday said screening by their orthoptists has been shown to be the best way of spotting any problems, and moved to let parents across the region know how best to access services.
I would normally refer any child whose mum has seen a squint to a group of specialists in detecting, and managing squints, called orthoptists. Opticians get much more practice in spotting squints but the end result is usually much the same, a referral to a hospital-based orthoptist.
Although chiefly for the practicing clinician, EYE offers valuable information for a wide audience of professionals and is encouraged for optometrists, orthoptists and other healthcare professionals and researchers in all aspects of the field of visual science.
While directed at an audience of health care students, including physiotherapists, occupational therapists, podiatrists, orthoptists, speech therapists, nurses and medical record administrators, this book has a potential wider audience.