orthopnea


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orthopnea

 [or″thop-ne´ah]
dyspnea that is relieved in the upright position; see also platypnea.

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr'thop-nē'ă, ōr-thop'nē-ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although orthopne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation orthop'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat. Compare: platypnea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

orthopnea

/or·thop·nea/ (or″thop-ne´ah) dyspnea that is relieved in the upright position.orthopne´ic

orthopnea

[ôrthop′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, orthos + pnoia, breath
an abnormal condition in which a person must sit or stand to breathe deeply or comfortably. It occurs in many disorders of the cardiac and respiratory systems, such as asthma, pulmonary edema, emphysema, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and angina pectoris. Assessment includes noting the number of pillows used by the patient. Patients with orthopnea also report sleeping in recliners. Also spelled orthopnoea. See also dyspnea. orthopneic, adj.

orthopnea

Clinical medicine Dyspnea in a Pt with moderate CHF, due to ↑ venous return from failing ventricles; such Pts breathe better when sitting straight or standing erect

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr-thop'nē'ă)
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat.
Compare: platypnea
Synonym(s): orthopnoea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

Orthopnea

Difficulty in breathing that occurs while the patient is lying down.
Mentioned in: Shortness of Breath

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr-thop'nē'ă)
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat.
Synonym(s): orthopnoea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

orthopnea (ôr´thopnē´ə),

n an inability to breathe except in an upright position.

orthopnea

ability to breathe easily only while standing, seen in congestive heart failure.

orthopneic position
dogs with congestive heart failure will resist lying down, preferring to stand or sit in order to relieve pulmonary congestion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessing nocturnal hypoventilation Symptoms Morning headaches, restless sleep, daytime sleepiness, orthopnea, recurrent respiratory problems, cor pulmonale Lung function Simple spirometry--FEV1 and VC (erect and supine) Peak cough flow Respiratory muscle strength Maximum inspiratory and expiratory muscle pressures Sniff nasal inspiratory pressures Gas exchange SpO2 Venous blood bicarbonate or base excess Arterial blood gases Nocturnal monitoring Overnight oximetry Transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring Cardiorespiratory monitoring (SpO2, airflow and chest wall movement) Polysomnography Table III.
The patient had reported onset of fever, cough, and weakness 2 days before admission and also new onset of orthopnea and bilateral leg swelling.
This state is associated with dyspnea, orthopnea, adventitious lung sounds, use of accessory muscles for breathing, nasal flaring, mucous membrane cyanosis, decreased oxygen saturation, and altered ABGs.
Patients with heart failure may present with dyspnea, orthopnea, activity intolerance, rapid weight gain, fatigue, or edema.
The diagnosis of HF was based on clinical symptoms (dyspnea, orthopnea, lung rales, leg edema) and confirmed by echocardiography studies and x-ray examination.
The IV injection should be performed with the patient supine or as close to supine as possible if the patient is experiencing orthopnea (discomfort in breathing when lying flat).
A 36-year old woman with complaints of dyspepsia, fatigue, and exertional dyspnea reported no chest pain, orthopnea, nocturnal dyspnea, vaginal bleeding, haematemesis, melena, or haematochezia.
In the 48 hours before admission at Mayo, she was profoundly dyspneic, arriving in extremis with orthopnea.
examples: angina pectoris or myocardial infarction (MI) history, cerebrovascular accident (CVA) history, insulin dependent diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF) with orthopnea and ankle edema, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis exercise asthma
In one of the studies beneficial response was also noted for: orthopnea, presence of third heart sound and the number of patients classified as NYHA Class III and IV.
A 67-year-old male was referred to pulmonology clinic for progressive hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion for 15 years, presenting as severe dyspnea and orthopnea with acceleration in the past two months.