orthopnea


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orthopnea

 [or″thop-ne´ah]
dyspnea that is relieved in the upright position; see also platypnea.

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr'thop-nē'ă, ōr-thop'nē-ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although orthopne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation orthop'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat. Compare: platypnea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

orthopnea

Clinical medicine Dyspnea in a Pt with moderate CHF, due to ↑ venous return from failing ventricles; such Pts breathe better when sitting straight or standing erect

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr-thop'nē'ă)
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat.
Compare: platypnea
Synonym(s): orthopnoea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]

Orthopnea

Difficulty in breathing that occurs while the patient is lying down.
Mentioned in: Shortness of Breath

or·thop·ne·a

(ōr-thop'nē'ă)
Discomfort in breathing that is brought on or aggravated by lying flat.
Synonym(s): orthopnoea.
[ortho- + G. pnoē, a breathing]
References in periodicals archive ?
At 1 year, 3 patients continued to experience substantial orthopnea and dyspnea on exertion, and 2 had no respiratory symptoms.
Examination revealed orthopnea and lip and skin cyanosis.
A 15 year old girl with type-1 diabetes mellitus since the age of 4 years, resident of Peshawar, was admitted through outpatient department with complaints of progressive peri-orbital puffiness, pedal edema, dyspnoea, orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea since one month, associated with polyuria, nocturnal enuresis, and frequent episodes of dysuria, fever associated with rigors and chills diagnosed and treated as recurrent urinary tract infections, with rest of the systemic inquiry being unremarkable.
(3,6,7) The most common presenting symptom is dyspnea, followed by atypical chest pain, hemoptysis, orthopnea, and non-specific symptoms such as nausea, emesis, fever, and anorexia.
A 71-year-old female patient was admitted to emergency unit with severe dyspnea, angina, and orthopnea symptoms in the preceding 5 days.
He denied any chest pain, dyspnea, or orthopnea, but indicated that he'd been having difficulty swallowing food for the past month.
One of the reasons for that difficulty is that symptoms frequently observed in patients with heart disease, like fatigue, shortness of breath, orthopnea, palpitations, chest pain or discomfort, dizziness and leg edema, are also commonly reported during normal pregnancy (5).
The eligibility criteria for targeted screening consisted of (a) documented history of cardiopathy (patients with known risk factors and/or structural heart diseases predisposing to HF, such as left ventricular hypertrophy, left ventricular dilation, or hypocontractility; asymptomatic valvular heart disease; or previous myocardial infarction) (10); (b) symptoms suggestive of HF [dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, lower extremity edema, or rapid weight gain (defined as a 2 kg increase over 48 h or less)] (12); and (c) no previous diagnosis.
No significant differences in age, sex, current residency, and cardiopulmonary symptoms (e.g., dyspnea, orthopnea, peripheral edema) were found between patients with or without HHV-8 antibodies.
While symptoms of dyspnea, orthopnea, or increasing peripheral edema are the first that come to mind when thinking of a CHF exacerbation, we must broaden our scope to include such things as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloating which can also indicate worsening cardiac function.
There was no history of orthopnea, PND, chest pain or syncopal attack.
She was admitted to the emergency department with rapidly progressing dyspnea, orthopnea and edema of the legs.