orthogenesis


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Related to orthogenesis: Saltationism, orthogneiss

or·tho·gen·e·sis

(ōr'thō-jen'ĕ-sis),
The doctrine that evolution is governed by intrinsic factors and occurs in predictable directions.
[ortho- + G. genesis, origin]

orthogenesis

(ôr′thō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. Biology The hypothesis, now largely discredited, that the evolution of species is linear and driven largely by internal factors rather than by natural selection.
2. Anthropology The hypothesis that all cultures evolve in a linear manner from primitivism to civilization.

or′tho·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
or′tho·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

orthogenesis

[ôr′thəjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, orthos + genesis, origin
the theory that evolution is controlled by intrinsic factors within the organism and progresses according to a predetermined course rather than in several directions as a result of natural selection and other environmental factors. orthogenetic, adj.

orthogenesis

a discredited theory of evolution which held that development took place along predetermined lines unaffected by selective processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
So he was obviously presupposing a kind of orthogenesis, as did his many followers in the social sciences.
If we get rid of the orthogenesis, then the whole program loses its basic premise.
Darwinism had been replaced by a guided evolution in which direction or orthogenesis operated.
inside parallelism, orthogenesis, and whatnot, but these notions seemed
The critics of orthogenesis contend that this conception of the evolutionary process is fundamentally flawed, and wishful thinking.
It is perfectly legitimate and proper to recognize that there have in fact been specific directional trends of various kinds over the course of evolutionary history that are not the products of orthogenesis, or vitalism, or thermodynamics, or, for that matter, random accidents (a `drunkard's walk' in the i/vivid metaphor of Stephen Jay Gould, 1996).
The modern synthesis of the 1940s rid evolutionary biology of teleological theories such as aristogenesis and orthogenesis (Romer 1949; Mayr 1988), but more biologically plausible theories have been formulated that predict an inherently directional course of evolution as a result of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors (Alberch 1980; LaBarbera 1986; Vermeij 1987; Bonner 1988; McKinney 1990).
The idea of tendency in itself is teleological (Bernier, 1984); it refers back to ideas like progression and progress, orthogenesis, creative force (i.
Parasites, with their presumed evolutionarily degenerate nature, overspecialization, and dependence on their hosts, were thus considered key examples of orthogenesis.