oropharyngeal cancer


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oropharyngeal cancer

ENT A malignancy of the lips, tongue, floor of mouth, salivary glands, buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and throat; most are SCCs linked to tobacco use and/or smoking, and tend to spread rapidly High risk factors Alcohol abuse, poor dental and oral hygiene, chronic irritation–eg, rough teeth, dentures, etc; OCs begin as leukoplakia or mouth ulcers; 2:1, ♂:♀. See Squamous cell carcinoma.
Oropharyngeal cancer-Stages
I   Lesion is ≤ 2 cm and confined to the oropharynx
II   Lesion is between 2 cm and 4 cm and confined to the oropharynx
III  Lesion is ≥ 4 cm and may involve a single lymph node on same side of neck
IV  Lesion has spread to the hard palate, tongue, or larynx, to nearby lymph nodes, or metastasized
References in periodicals archive ?
SCC, the most common histologic type of oropharyngeal cancer, accounted for 557 (94.
And smaller proportions thought sons were susceptible to genital warts (18%), oropharyngeal cancer (11%), anal cancer (9%), and penile cancer (9%).
But patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer also tend to be younger, have a smaller tumor at diagnosis, and are less likely to smoke than HPV-negative patients.
The supraglottic swallow maneuver did not produce a functional change in the timing or extent of movements of the oropharyngeal structures affecting swallow physiology in this patient with oropharyngeal cancer.
A snapshot of the global therapeutic scenario for Oropharyngeal Cancer.
1) Data shows that oropharyngeal cancers are becoming more prevalent in younger adults with no history of smoking or drinking.
New data from the United States show that the association of HPV with oropharyngeal cancers is more common than previously believed; furthermore, the most common HPV types detected in these cancers are types prevented by available vaccines.
We know that HPV infection is associated with oropharyngeal cancer, but we don't know how the virus progresses from initial infection to cancer in the oral cavity.
Around 500 patients are diagnosed with H&N cancer every year in Wales, a figure that has remained relatively constant, however, the number of patients presenting with oropharyngeal cancer has tripled in the past 20 years.
Rates of oropharyngeal cancer, a type of oral cancer, have increased dramatically in the United States since 1984, with human papillomavirus-related tumors accounting for a growing majority of all new cases, according to a recent study.
Screening the sexual partners of oropharyngeal cancer patients has been discussed, but there is no evidence to support the practice.
Whereas the incidence of head and neck cancer overall appears to be falling in some countries, consonant with a decrease in the incidence of smoking, epidemiologic studies have confirmed that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers is rising in absolute numbers.