orienting reflex

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or·i·ent·ing re·flex

an aspect of attending in which an organism's initial response to a change or to a novel stimulus is such that the organism becomes more sensitive to the stimulation; for example, dilation of the pupil of the eye in response to dim light.

orienting reflex

(ôr′ē-ən-tĭng, -ĕn′-)
n.
An aspect of responding to environmental stimuli in which an organism's initial response to a change or novel stimulus makes the organism more sensitive to the stimulation, as when the pupil of the eye dilates in response to dim light.

or·i·ent·ing re·flex

(ōr'ē-en-ting rē'fleks)
An aspect of attending in which an organism's initial response to a change or to a novel stimulus is such that the organism becomes more sensitive to the stimulation (e.g., dilation of the pupil of the eye in response to dim light).
Synonym(s): orienting response.

orienting reflex

a component of the behavioral state of readiness or arousal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When a stimulus was presented for 500 ms, there was an orienting response in the guilty group but the intergroup difference was not significant, F(2.
According to orienting response theory, there is a difference in the response patterns of innocent and guilty examinees depending on the importance of a stimulus, but as the stimulus is presented repeatedly, habituation takes place (Verschuere, Ben-Shakhar, et al.
For example, the effects of habituation result in a decrease of the orienting response with the continuous presentation of similar stimuli (e.
Elicitation and habituation of the electrodermal orienting response in a short interstimulus interval paradigm.
Described by Pavlov in dogs, the orienting response allows one to determine if a new item is a good thing, such as food, or a threat, such as a predator, and to react accordingly.
Television programs, either by design or default, exploit our orienting response.
Bernstein (1969), Maltzman (1977), and Naatanen (1997) argued that a change in stimulus input may not be sufficient to induce an orienting response and proposed stimulus significance as an additional condition for the response.
Theories of habituation of the orienting response can be divided into two general types, comparator theories and non-comparator theories.
At first blush, this pattern of results - the changing state effect - suggests similarities in the action of irrelevant sound to the evocation of an orienting response (OR; see Sokolov, 1963, 1975).
The test is based on a basic psychophysiologic principle of enhanced orienting responses to significant stimuli.